Division of School Facilities


Welcome To DSF
New emergency hotline (718)668-8870 for up-to-date information about school and office closings as well as other important notifications
About Us
Our Mission

The Department of Education’s Division for School Facilities (DSF) is dedicated to providing a safe, clean and comfortable environment that is conducive in educating and nurturing our children in the most economical and efficient manner possible.

Who We Are

The Division of School Facilities (DSF) is primarily responsible for the maintenance, repair, and the safe, efficient operation of all facilities under the jurisdiction of the The City of New York's school system. Currently, there are over 1,400 buildings that make up the Department of Education infrastructure.

We provide expertise in every aspect of building management and maintenance. This is accomplished with a dedicated corps of Custodian Engineers, handymen, cleaners assigned to each school, and assisted by a group of mobile Skilled Trades Mechanics who tackle complex work beyond the scope of on-site staff.

The DSF employs approximately 500 mechanics, 900 custodian engineers, 100 building managers and approximately 300 other employees with administrative or technical expertise in the fields of facilities management, engineering, environmental health, administration, accounting, construction, planning, and project management. A portion of our maintenance budget is also allocated to carefully vetted private contractors.

What We Do

DSF oversees approximately 130 million square feet of floor space in over 1,237 separate sites throughout the five boroughs of the City of New York.

This includes cleaning, garbage disposal, heating, air conditioning, plumbing, carpentry, painting, minor repairs, environmental health and safety and all other aspects of building maintenance.

To assure reliability, efficiency and adequacy in all building maintenance and operations, we track repair work from initiation to completion, constantly monitoring and assessing quality and cost, through the use of Passport, a state-of-the-art Computerized Maintenance Management System, as well as Key Performance Indicators and other metrics.

DSF Offices

To provide a school environment that allows students to realize their full potential and to improve the quality of life in the community we serve.

View DSF Organization Chart (PDF)

Contact DSF Main Office:

Division of School Facilities Central Headquarters
44-36 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City, NY 11101
Central Telephone Number: 718 - 349 - 5799

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  • John Shea
  • Division of School Facilities
  • Chief Executive Officer
  • 718-349-5410
  • 347-735-1312
  • JShea3@schools.nyc.gov
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  • Jonathan Canty
  • Environmental Emergency Response
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  • 718-361-3835
  • 347-408-6756
  • JCanty@schools.nyc.gov
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  • Linda S. Green
  • Division of School Facilities
  • Chief Administrative Officer
  • 718-349-5680
  • 347-408-6838
  • LGreen@schools.nyc.gov
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  • Alan Boccio
  • IT Services, Enterprise Development and Support
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  • 718-610-0314
  • 646-823-4277
  • ABoccio@schools.nyc.gov
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  • William Estelle
  • Division of School Facilities
  • Executive Director
  • 718-349-5477
  • 347-386-4442
  • WEstell@schools.nyc.gov
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  •   Vacant
  • Field Operations - Facilities Management Services
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  • Salvatore Calderone
  • Field Operations - Custodial Operations
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  • 718-349-5736
  • 347-386-4462
  • SCalder@schools.nyc.gov
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Bronx (#1)

Anthony Salvadore

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Al Gigante

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Parmanand Ramphal

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  • Deputy Director of Facilities
  • 718-361-3747
  • 646-341-0737
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Sunita Mahabir

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Davis Amedu

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Mitchell Seminario

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Anthony LoFaso

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David Newell, Jr.

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Adam Rubin

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Chris Caiafa

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Jean Delgrosso

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Queens (#2)

Gregory Bracco

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Stephen O'Shea

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Meerza Mohamed

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Ludwig Manz

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Derek Kearns

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Fred Ardis

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Leonard Pasquale

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Vincent Galante

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Thomas Keaney

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Hugh DiDonna

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Leo Marinconz

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Denis Belokostolsky

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Mark Devincenzo

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Manhattan (#3)

Timothy George

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Thomas Fanizzi

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Mark Voros

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Christopher Oehl

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Timothy Dowd

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Chris Bortle

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Daniel Hernandez

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John Delvino

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Christopher Leya

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North Bklyn (#4)

Joseph Lazarus

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Peter Mischler

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Harry Torkelsen

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Phanuel Markin

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David LaBush

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Myles Kehoe

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Kevin Nolan

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Robert Moss

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Carmine Franzese

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S.I. / S. Bklyn (#5)

Mark Harri

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Michael Fiore

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Naser Hamoudeh

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Orlando Douglas

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John Rodriquez

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Brian McCormick

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Richard Frisby

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Anthony Miano

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Nicholas DelBianco

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Joseph Cordero

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Mitchell Markson

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Human Resources
Labor Relations

Labor Relations

Labor Relations
Hr Faqs

Frequently Asked Questions

What kinds of jobs are available as DSF? How do I find out about them? How do I apply?

Skilled Trades:
The Division of School Facilities employs various skilled trade mechanics. Some of the civil service titles include electricians, plumbers, steamfitters, and carpenters. Most of the employees are hired from civil service lists. The following web site details civil service examinations for the current fiscal year: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcas/html/home/home.shtml

It is suggested that you refer to this web site every July to review the upcoming civil service examinations and apply if you qualify.

If a vacancy occurs within the skilled trade work force, the Division of School Facilities is required to hire from an active civil service list. If no civil service list exists, the position can be hired provisionally, of which a posting for the job will be issued. The position can be posted to this web site. So please check back frequently to review current job openings.

Administrative and Managerial positions:
All administrative and managerial positions for the DOE can be accessed at the following web site: http://schools.nyc.gov/Offices/DHR/CareerOpportunities/

What if I want a job as a Custodial Helper?

To be hired as a custodial helper/cleaner or handy-person, it is suggested that you visit the school within your community school district, also currently known as region, and schedule a meeting with the custodian engineer assigned to the school. The custodian engineer of each school is responsible for the interviewing and hiring of staff.

Where can I find out about benefits? (Medical/ Disability/Worker’s Compensation)
What about retirement benefits?

The following web site is where you can find information pertaining to the Board of Education’s Retirement System: http://www.nycbers.org/
You will find information on how to enroll in BERS and information pertaining to the Tax Deferred Annuity Program (TDA), loan information, and various BERS publications.

Programs & Initiatives

Sustainability Initiative

Health & Safety

AHERA - Asbestos

Asbestos Hazardous Emergency Response Act requires public and private non-profit primary and secondary schools to inspect their buildings for asbestos-containing building materials.

In 1986, the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (commonly referred to as AHERA) was signed into law. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has published regulations that require schools subject to AHERA to:

  • Perform an original inspection and periodic re-inspections every 3 years for asbestos containing material
  • Develop, maintain, and update an asbestos management plan and keep a copy at the school
  • Provide yearly notification to parent, teacher, and employee organizations regarding the availability of the school's asbestos management plan and any asbestos abatement actions taken or planned in the school
  • Designate a contact person to ensure the responsibilities of the local education agency are properly implemented
  • Perform periodic surveillance of known or suspected asbestos containing building material
  • Provide custodial staff with asbestos awareness training

Training

Useful links

Related Documents

PCB's

In recent years, EPA has learned that caulk containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was used in many buildings, including schools built between 1950 and 1978. Although this is an important issue, the potential presence of PCBs in school buildings of this age can be addressed in part by implementing Best Management Practices (BMPs).

Water Testing

The purpose of this program is to ensure, to the extent feasible, that the water use for consumption in New York City’s (NYC) public schools meet the Federal acceptable lead in drinking water level of equal or less than 0.020mg/L (< 0.020mg/L) set by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – Lead in Drinking Water in Schools and Non- Residential Buildings (EPA 812-B-94-002 April 1994).

  • Lead in Drinking Water Program for New York City Public Schools

    This program manual demonstrates how the water use for consumption in NYC’s public schools will be tested and how lead contamination problems will be addressed if found. In addition, this program manual outlines the interim preventive measures that the NYC Department of Education (DOE) is taking to reduce the potential of lead in drinking water exposure to its building's occupants. Furthermore, this manual provides procedures under which the test results will be reported and made available to students, parents, teachers, school principals and custodian engineers.
    This program manual is intended for use by school officials and personnel responsible for the maintenance and/or safety of the DOE facilities and by the DOE consultants and laboratories performing the water sampling and analysis.
    Lead in Drinking Water Program for New York City Public Schools Manual (pdf)

  • Lead Poisoning Prevention Program

    The mission of the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program of the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) is to prevent and control childhood lead poisoning.
    Visit the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Lead Poisoning Prevention Program page by clicking on the link below:
    The NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene: The Lead Poisoning Prevention Program

  • Potable Water Sampling Protocol For Lead Concentration in New York City Board of Education Elementary School Buildings

    This Elementary School Sampling Protocol (hereinafter the “protocol”) is based on EPA Guidance 812-B-94-002, dated April 1994, Lead in Drinking Water in Schools and Non-Residential Buildings (hereinafter, the “EPA Guidance”). The purpose of this Protocol is to collect, analyze and measure the concentration of lead in potable water in New York City Board of Education (NYCBOE) Elementary School Buildings. Initially, the Elementary School Sampling Protocol will be used to sample drinking water outlets at elementary schools that were not investigated as of May 31, 2002.
    The NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene: The Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (pdf)

  • Potable Water Sampling for Lead Concentration Sample Collection Form

    Potable Water Sampling for Lead Concentration Sample Collection Form (pdf)

  • Do not drink from this faucet signage

    Do not drink from this faucet signage (pdf)

Dust Control

The New York City Department of Education (DOE) is committed to providing a safe and healthy work environment for its employees, contractors and subcontractors, as well to the students, teachers, school staff and to all those who utilizes their school buildings.


Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) are being implemented by the DOE in order to ensure its commitment to providing a safe and healthy work environment and compliance with all applicable rules and regulations when Asbestos Containing Building Material (ACBM) and Lead-Based Paint (LBP) are disturbed. These SOPs are effective immediately and are designed to avoid any improper removal or disturbance of ACBM and/or LBP. These new procedures are to be followed by any individual who is going to perform any work in a NYC school building that will impact in any way any of the existing building materials.


Click on the link to view the Standard Operating Procedures for Dust control

Mold Remediation

Guidelines for the remediation/cleanup of mold and moisture problems in schools.

On May 7, 1993, the New York City Department of Health (DOH), the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA), and the Mt. Sinai Occupational Health Clinic convened an expert panel on Stachybotrys atra in Indoor Environments. The purpose of the panel was to develop policies for medical and environmental evaluation and intervention to address Stachybotrys atra (now known as Stachybotrys chartarum (SC)) contamination. The original guidelines were developed because of mold growth problems in several New York City buildings in the early 1990's. This document revises and expands the original guidelines to include all fungi (mold). It is based both on a review of the literature regarding fungi and on comments obtained by a review panel consisting of experts in the fields of microbiology and health sciences.

For more information, please visit New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene.


Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings
Concern about indoor exposure to mold has been increasing as the public becomes aware that exposure to mold can cause a variety of health effects and symptoms, including allergic reactions. This document presents guidelines for the remediation/cleanup of mold and moisture problems in schools and commercial buildings; these guidelines include measures designed to protect the health of building occupants and remediators.

For more information, please visit The United States Environmental Protection Agency.

Pest Control

Bed bugs can be found in many public places. Although people can unknowingly carry bed bugs with them into a school building, schools are not a friendly environment for bed bugs to live and reproduce.

The Department of Education is committed to identifying pests, providing thorough inspections of schools, and having licensed pest control specialists treat rooms as appropriate. The Bed Bug Information Kit contains instructions about submitting a suspected bed bug for identification and information about inspections and treatment provided by the DOE Pest Management Unit.,

If a specimen found in a school is confirmed by the Pest Management Unit to be a bed bug, principals may notify parents using the letter in the Kit, which is also available in Bengali, Chinese, French, Haitian-Creole, Korean, Russian and Spanish.

For more information:

If the DOE Pest Management Unit finds that a school is infested (bed bugs living and reproducing in an area), parents of all the students in the building will be notified and DOE will provide the appropriate treatment in the affected school areas.

Mercury Removal

By federal law, it will be illegal to export elemental mercury from the United States after the end of 2012

Visit the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for additional information on:

Mercury Removal in Schools:

SchoolStat

The SchoolStat system is a multi-modular application supporting the administration and conduct of facility inspections and the processing and presentation of inspection data.

What are SchoolStat’s features, functionality and benefits?

The SchoolStat system is a multi-modular application supporting the administration and conduct of facility inspections and the processing and presentation of inspection data.

The Inspection Administration Module permits effective and efficient scheduling of 10 full-time inspectors, ensuring assignments are of uniform size, travel time between sites is minimized and inspectors are rotated across the city.

The tablet-based Data Collection Module enables the mobile collection of multiple data streams (questionnaire responses, free text entry, digital imagery) and their integration into seamless inspection records. These records are subsequently transferred into a central database, reviewed for administrative completeness and stored.

The Scoring Module takes inspection data collected through questionnaire responses and synthesizes them into numerical scores by a series of algorithms. These scores allow comparison of different facilities across time and space, and analysis of causal factors. Scores are further rolled up across facilities to enable analysis of managerial effectiveness, resource allocation etc.

Finally, the SchoolStat website provides users with the ability to review both scores and underlying inspection observations (including text comments and digital photographs) using hyper-linked drill downs. Moreover, data may be reviewed with multivariate queries, downloaded for further analysis or e-mailed directly from the web site.

What business problem does SchoolStat solve?

SchoolStat is a program created to conduct periodic, non-technical, visual inspections of all school facilities. Other programs in the New York City Department of Education exist to provide detailed technical information regarding school facilities, however there was an unmet need for non-technical information, i.e., how the results of our facility maintenance and operations efforts appear to engaged, objective visitors who are not trained facilities professionals. Moreover, in the past the only operational information available regarding the state of our facilities was either anecdotal or subjective or inferential and retrospective. SchoolStat, however, provides data (not anecdotes), uniformly, on all sites, 3-4 times each year, with the results of each inspection available for review and action in near-real time.

Information technology is absolutely essential to the SchoolStat program - managing an inspection program of this scope and scale would be difficult and effective analysis of inspection results impossible, without it. The nominated application is the means by which SchoolStat inspection data is collected and processed in order to provide current, actionable intelligence regarding the state of facilities across the +1,000 sites where New York City public schools are located.

How has the business process been improved as a result of SchoolStat?

While SchoolStat's initial deployment is relatively recent, its impact has been both immediate and far-reaching.

The potential of this program to help drive improvement in the condition of our facilities is enormous and being realized daily, as conditions in facilities across the city may now be and are readily compared. Managers have vastly increased visibility of the conditions of the facilities in their charge and, as has been noted previously, the data available to them is updated continuously and made available in near-real time. The program has fostered increased accountability as senior managers review their subordinates' scores and, moreover, a healthy sense of competition and pride among managers as their facilities' scores are visible to their peers.

In addition to increasing overall managerial effectiveness, inspection data can be used for more detailed analysis. For example, the incidence of specific deficiencies may be analyzed both within sites, between sites, across time or in combination. Such analyses can guide technical decisions concerning maintenance and custodial methods and materials. Whereas in the past such analyses depended on discrete studies, SchoolStat now provides an on-going source of objective data.

The possibilities are immense and will only grow as a data time series is built.

What has been the economic benefit of SchoolStat?

The primary aim of the SchoolStat project is to provide current, objective data regarding the condition of our school facilities. This data is not intended to help us either spend less or avoid spending more at the macro level, but to raise our schools' facility conditions to the highest possible level given available resources.

Thus, the total economic benefit of this project doesn't derive from cost savings or cost avoidance, but from assistance in spending what we have as wisely as possible, through improving managerial oversight and guiding resource allocation.

Who benefits from the use of SchoolStat?

The ultimate beneficiaries of this project, of course, are the schoolchildren attending New York City's public schools: they, and the Department of Education's school-based professionals, benefit from the improved facility conditions resulting from use of SchoolStat-collected data.

The most direct beneficiaries of the project, however, are the managers within the Division of School Facilities who use the SchoolStat system to improve the operations and maintenance of the facilities under their stewardship. They benefit both from the SchoolStat project's data and from the use of the application presenting that data.

Finally, the most direct beneficiaries of the application alone are the administrators and inspectors of the SchoolStat unit, whose tasks would be tremendously more onerous if the nominated application were not available to assist them.

Who do I contact with a question?

Please contact Gaindaa Sawh at either (718) 707-4308 or GSawh@schools.nyc.gov

Improvement Projects

New York City Public School Principals now have the power to choose and gain access to more resources for enhancing public school facilities through a partnership with The Division of School Facilities.
How can New York City Public School Principals make improvements to their schools?
About Market Maker Projects

The Division of School Facilities partners with schools to ensure all New York City public schools are safe and welcoming environments for student learning. This partnership involves two work streams: general maintenance and improvement projects.

General maintenance includes the day-to-day operations of the facility and repair or replacement of equipment due to normal wear and tear of the operating components of the building’s facility and grounds. This work stream is generally led by the school-based Custodian Engineer or Building Manager in consultation with the Principal and the school’s Deputy Director of Facilities. These functions are funded out of the Division of School Facilities' general operating budget; additional funding is not required from the school.

Improvement projects are initiatives not necessary for the general maintenance of the building but rather involve optional work which enhances or improves the facility. These projects are determined by the principal and funded solely from the school's discretionary budget. Given the challenging and time-consuming nature of managing a construction project which includes developing a scope of work and cost estimate as well as ensuring health, safety, labor law and building code regulations are being followed the Division of School Facilities is prepared to help schools initiate and manage school these projects for them. DSF calls this program the Market Maker program.

Management: Division of School Facilities Contract Managers are experienced professionals available to help schools initiate and manage school improvement projects. After an initial consultation, they will:

  • secure a contracted vendor
  • prepare a scope of work, including project cost
  • issue a proceed notice to the contractor, upon agreement of scope and price
  • inspect the work
  • ensure that the contractor conforms to standard maintenance and repair requirements (labor law, insurance, dust protocol, building code, etc.)
  • approve the contractor's application for payment

Cost: Most DSF Improvement Projects may range from $500 up to $100,000. If your project exceeds that amount, please feel free to contact Mark David (mdavid@schools.nyc.gov).

Marker Maker Process for DOE Schools
  • Request a consultation
    Schools interested in exploring optional school improvement projects should contact their Custodian Engineer, Building Manager and/or school’s Deputy Director of Facilities (DDF).

    The Custodian Engineer, Building Manager, or DDF will enter the work request into the Division of School Facilities’ Maintenance Management System to initiate the request.
  • Work with a DSF Contract Manager
    A DSF Contract Manager will visit the school to develop, a scope of work, cost estimate and timeline for the project based on the school’s initial request and budget.
  • As many of these improvement projects include increasing the use of energy through the installation of air conditioning, smartboards or other technology it is important to remember that before any of these projects are performed DSF’s Office of Sustainability must first approve the project. The school’s DDF will assist in making this request to this Office.
  • Review and approve the project
    Once the DSF Contract Manager provides a scope of work and cost estimate, the principal reviews it for final approval.

    If the principal determines the school cannot afford to fund the project at the current time the quote will be honored by DSF through the end of the fiscal year.
  • Purchase Order Issued
    Once the project has been approved, the principal uses FAMIS to issue a purchase order to the Division of School Facilities (DSF) to pay for the project using the following process:

    • Schedule funds in Galaxy, almost always in object code 0676
    • Log into FAMIS
    • Go to Purchasing
    • Go to Contracted
    • Click on the NON-LIST-LINK and generate a PO to DSF using Vendor Code FAC000001 (Vendor Name: “Facilities Enhancements” ). Schools will go thru the same process to generate a PO to DSF as they would go through to generate a PO to any other contracted external professional services vendor except schools do not need to obtain competitive bids in order to generate a PO to DSF.
  • Schools cannot fund this project using grant money or funds emanating from the Department’s reimbursable codes (U /A 481/482) as DSF does not have the ability to access those accounts.
    • Once the PO is approved by the principal and/or its Network, DSF is electronically notified it has been given a PO and the Division’s Maintenance team can begin work.

      If assistance is required to generate the Purchase Order, schools should contact their Network leader for budget and accounting or DSF’s Finance office.
  • Work begins
    Once DSF receives the PO it authorizes DSF’s contractor to begin the project.
  • Approve the finished work
    After the work has been completed, the contract manager approves the vendor’s application for payment and pays the vendor using the funds provided to DSF by the school through its Purchase Order to DSF.
Charter Schools Partner with DSF

Charter Partnering with DSF for an Improvement

  • Request a consultation
    Charter Organizations interested in exploring optional school improvement projects should contact their Custodian Engineer, Building Manager and/or school’s Deputy Director of Facilities (DDF). The Custodian Engineer, Building Manager, or DDF will enter the work request into the Division of School Facilities’ Maintenance Management System to initiate the request.
  • Work with a DSF Contract Manager
    A DSF Contract Manager will visit the school to develop, a scope of work, cost estimate and timeline for the project based on the school’s initial request and budget.
    • As many of these improvement projects include increasing the use of energy through the installation of air conditioning, smartboards or other technology it is important to remember that before any of these projects are performed DSF’s Office of Sustainability must first approve the project. The school’s DDF will assist in making this request to this Office.
  • Review and approval of the project
    Once the DSF Contract Manager provides a scope of work and cost estimate, if you want the work to be done, you will need to enter a request for approval for the work into the Charter Work Request Application. Work in your areas may trigger Charter Matching requirements which have to be planned and budgeted for by the Department. Your request must be approved by the Office of Space Planning, the Director of Facilities, and the Chancellor before work can be done.

    The quote will be honored by DSF through the end of the fiscal year, which should be more than sufficient time for the approval process.
  • Deposit Check
    Once the project has been approved, you will need to contact Mark David, DSF’s Director of Finance at (mdavid@schools.nyc.gov) to discuss payment terms and conditions.
  • Work begins
    Once DSF receives payment, it authorizes DSF’s contractor to begin the project.
  • Approve the finished work
    After the work has been completed, and the contract manager approves the vendor’s application for payment, you will be billed for the outstanding balance of any project costs.
DOE/Charter Schools Partner with Third Party Contractor

Work with contractors through third party agreements

Third Party Agreements are for work which will be performed under the supervision of an individual selected by the responsible school or organization, and where the work will be done by a contractor selected by the school/organization and where the contractor does not have a direct contract for the work issued by the Department. The School or Organization (or others such as the school's Parents Association or a non-profit organization) will fund the project and is solely responsible for paying the contractor(s) for the work.

If the work is funded by public (school or district) funds, then the work must be solicited in accordance with the Department's bidding procedures with appropriate documentation of adherence to the procedures. Where the source of funds for the work to be performed comes from private sources, such as Alumni associations, Parents Associations, a Foundation, an individual, or a corporation, vendor selection is not subject to the SOPM requirements for solicitation of bids.

Where required by code the contractor performing the work must have a license for the work and be designated in the submittal. When the work requires filing with the Department of Buildings or other City agency, the school is responsible for engaging and paying for the services of the registered professional to design and file the work.

You must have a full description of the work to be done. The scope of work submitted should reference the materials or equipment to be used (manufacturer's make and model for example). We strongly suggest that you and your contractors review the approved items for the type of work being done. These may be checked by going to the New York City School Construction Authority website at: http://www.nycsca.org/Business/WorkingWithTheSCA/Design/Pages/Specifications.aspx

Your contractors must pay the prevailing rate for the trade doing the work. NOTE: the NYC Comptroller requires that owners and partners performing covered work on jobs requiring the payment of prevailing wages be paid the prevailing rate for any hours so worked. You are responsible for obtaining and checking Certified Payroll Forms from the contractor indicating the hours, wages, and benefits paid to the employees of the contractor who worked on the project. These forms need to be kept on file at the school after completion of the work.

Charter Schools are also subject to prevailing wage payment requirements for work in a City owned building or property. This is the position of Corporate Counsel based on the Appellate Court decision in the Pyramid Development case.

The process is outlined below:

  • The process begins when the school or organization initiates a third party request in the application. See link below to start a request.
  • You will be asked for information on your organization, what work you want to have done, the locations where work will be done, the contractor who will do the work, the cost of the work, whether the work will change the use of the space or the grade using the space, etc.
  • Your request will be routed for the required approvals to: The principal of the school in which the work will be done and after approval by the Principal to the Director of Facilities and (if change of use/grade is requested) to the Director of Space Planning.
  • Once approved, your request will be checked with regard to and approvals will be entered for items such as:
    • Contractor information including licenses, liens, previous issues with other City Agencies
    • Whether the contractor has appropriate and required insurance
    • To make sure your contractor is aware of the specific requirements of the Dust Control Protocol established for the safety of students and staff
    • Presence of ACM and/or LBP that will be disturbed by the work to be done
    • Materials being installed meet or exceed the Department’s minimum quality requirements for the items to be installed
  • You may be asked for additional information that we need to review your request. You will be notified and reminded if you have not gotten back to us with the information we need.
  • Once all the approvals are in place, you will be sent a copy of the final agreement which you will need to have signed and returned to DSF before work can start.

DOE and Charter Schools on the DOE Network click hereTo submit an Initial Request.
Charter Schools not on the DOE Network click here To submit an Initial Request

RESO A Capital Eligible Projects

Certain large projects may be eligible for capital funding. These projects include large auditorium renovations, library renovations, laboratory upgrades, and playground improvements among others. These projects are selected by your local City Council representative or your Borough President and funded through the capital program of the NYC School Construction Authority. Since the capital program for schools is a five year program, projects of this type, which enhance the learning experience, and improve the esthetics of your school are a good fit for RESO A projects as the capital program is driven by capacity needs, infrastructure needs, and specific programs. Below is a link to the NYC School Construction Authority’s very informative RESO A site. Once a RESO A project is awarded the funds flow to the SCA and depending on size and complexity of the project (generally less than $500,000 where formal plans are not required) the DSF may perform the work for the school and the SCA.

http://www.nycsca.org/Community/Programs/Pages/ResolutionA.aspx

Featured Improvement Projects

Below is a list of the most popular school improvement projects. The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).

Air-conditioning

Cool things off by adding window-unit air conditioners. Request a site visit so that a facilities expert can analyze the electrical and mounting requirements for your facility, provide a price estimate, and make arrangements for proper installation. Prices generally fall into two categories.

Prices:

Basic installation without additional electrical requirements. (Replacement of existing units) $900 TO $1400, per unit
Complex installation including new electrical wiring. $900 to $1400, per unit, plus cost of $2500 for installing dedicated electric circuit(s)
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).

In rare cases, some schools are located in electrical grids that can not support air conditioners.
Auditoriums

Before the curtain drops on next year’s student performances, give your school’s auditorium a face lift with new curtains and auditorium seats. The Facilities team will help purchase and install stage curtains and rigging that meets all safety regulations. Auditorium windows can also be fitted with curtains to block out distracting lights. If the auditorium chairs are beginning to show their age, then schools might consider replacing all seats or sections of seats as the school budget permits.

Prices:

Seats—All Schools $265 per seat
Curtains and Drapes—Elementary School $20,000 to $30,000
Curtains and Drapes—Elementary School with windows $30,000 to $45,000
Curtains and Drapes—Junior High School $40,000 to $60,000
Curtains and Drapes—Junior School with windows $50,000 to $75,000
Curtains and Drapes—High School $60,000 to $80,000
Curtains and Drapes—High School with windows $90,000 to $110,000
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).
Display Boards

Forget about dusty erasers and add new dry-erase or bulletin boards to classrooms, hallways, and other display areas.

Prices:

Dry-erase board 4'x 8' $750 each
Bulletin Boards 4'x 8' $650 each
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).
Floors

School facility teams will continue to provide general maintenance and repair of school floors. However, refinishing floors is a school improvement project that can substantially enhance the school environment. Give your facility new life by adding carpet, replacing vinyl tile, or refinishing hardwood floors.

Prices:

Classroom refinishing $2.50 per square foot
Gymnasium refinishing $2.50 to $3.00 per square foot
Auditorium Stage refinishing $2,000 to $8,000
Vinyl flooring with underlay $5 per square foot
Commercial grade carpet $40 per square yard
Allegro Dance Floor $22.50 per square foot
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).
Gymnasiums

Help students lock away textbooks, gym socks, and other personal property by installing new lockers. Don’t spruce up the locker room and forget about the fans. Also, consider installing comfortable new bleachers to keep the home crowd cheering.

Prices:

Interior lockers $280 each
Interior Bleachers $155 per seat
Wall Padding $8 per square foot
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).
Lighting and Electrical

Increase safety and energy efficiency with electrical improvement projects. Brighten up hallways and transform spaces in need of lights or replace old lighting systems with new more energy efficient models. Add roof and perimeter lighting to increase building security as well. Get the students to class on time with hard-wired clocks. Expand the school PA system to include modular systems in the cafeteria, gym, or other public spaces.

Prices:

Electrical Outlets (1-9) $2,000 each
Classroom Fixtures $300 each
Hallway/Stairway Fixtures $275 each
Security Lighting (Roof) $20,000 and up
Single Face Clocks $500 each
Double Face Clocks $800 each
PA System Survey needed to determine price.
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).
Painting

School wall paints are generally refreshed every five years, but maybe a school wants to show school spirit with a special new color or the new English teacher no longer likes the nature murals left on the classroom walls by the last science teacher. Schools can opt for special painting improvement projects.

Prices:

Classroom Ceiling $1,650
Classroom Complete $2,500
Corridors/Stairways $2.50 per square foot
Elementary School Gymnasium $15,000
Elementary School Cafeteria $10,000
Elementary School Auditorium $15,000
Junior High School Gymnasium $25,000
Junior High School Cafeteria $15,000
Junior High School Auditorium $25,000
High School Gymnasium $40,000
High School Cafeteria $25,000
High School Auditorium $50,000
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).
Playgrounds, Surfacing and Flagpoles

Fight childhood obesity and let students burn off some pent up energy on new and improved playground equipment. Schools that are not already slated for playgrounds as capital improvements through the School Construction Authority might consider sprucing up the school yard with some new additions and/or "poured" rubber playground surfacing.

Prices:

Poured in place rubber playground surfacing $18 per square foot
40' Fiberglass Flagpole $7,500
50' Fiberglass Flagpole $8,500
60' Fiberglass Flagpole $9,500
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).
Restrooms

Improve restroom facilities by replacing fixtures and tiles or execute a complete makeover.

Prices:

Elementary School conversion $20,000 to $30,000
Junior High School conversion $40,000 to $60,000
High School conversion $60,000 to $80,000
Toilet Partitions $1,900 each
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).

Contact DSF
  • For processing issues email Mark David, DSF’s Finance Director(MDavid@schools.nyc.gov 718-349-5794) or Mel Chaiken, DSF’s Controller(Mchaike@schools.nyc.gov 718-610-0257)
  • For operational questions go to your school's main contact person, the Deputy Director of Facilities (DDF). You can find out your DDF by entering your school's Building ID (not org ID) on DSF's web site.

Building Operator Certification Training Programing

Introduction
A Message from John Shea, DSF Chief Executive
The DOE is committed to reducing the energy consumption in our schools. Lowering our fossil fuel and electricity usage not only saves the City money, but even more importantly it creates a cleaner, healthier learning environment for our children. One of the most effective ways to reduce energy consumption in our school buildings is through the proper use and timely maintenance of the mechanical and electrical systems and equipment by the building operating staff.

This is why we are offering the Level I Building Operator Certification (BOC) Course. The BOC Course will cover HVAC systems, electrical systems, energy data and its use in operations, energy audits, integrated energy-related maintenance practice and indoor air-quality over a 30-week period. All training will be conducted at the DSF building at 44-36 Vernon Boulevard in Long Island City.

We have partnered with the IUOE, CUNY, and the Department of Citywide Administrative Services to develop a successful learning opportunity. We are very pleased to offer this certification program, and look forward to working with the building based staff in all the five boroughs to manage our school buildings in a more efficient and healthy manner.

A Message from Michael Bobker of the CUNY Building Performance Lab
The Building Operator Certification (BOC) is increasingly recognized as the leading credential in energy management and indoor environmental quality. As the New York City-authorized training provider for BOC, the CUNY Building Performance Lab has worked with the Division of School Facilities throughout the Summer of 2010 to customize a training program tailored to the needs of NYC DOE staff. While even this 90-hour program will not allow enough time to cover every topic in as much depth as we would like, I am confident that the participants will walk away from every session having learned one or two important new pieces of information and prepared to make change happen in their schools. Ultimately, the proof is in the pudding, and we hope to see the trainee's armed and motivated to make important operational changes that will enhance the school facilities’ performance. Along with CUNY’s School of Professional Studies, we look forward to providing this training over the coming two years.
Class Schedules
Please click here to view the Class Calendar

BOC Training for NYC public school custodial engineers two course sequence:
  • Building Systems: An Energy & Operations Perspective (Weeks 1-15)
  • Principles of Energy Management and Green Building Practices (Weeks 16-30)

Overview course description
Introduction to building systems, especially as related to energy use and the quality of the indoor environment. Focus on equipment and system functions, thermal comfort, lighting and air quality, understanding of building loads and their implications for optimized building control. Class and facility-based practical projects emphasize system observations, documentation, and testing for operational assessment and improvement. Use of EnergyStar Portfolio Manager and associated tools are emphasized for improved management of energy and water.
Instructional Team
  • Project Director: Patrick Dail, CUNY School of Professional Studies
  • Lead Instructor: Peter J. Weisner, CEM, LEED GA
  • Instructors: Peter M. Gorry, RPA / Asit Patel, CEM / Robert Bryce, RA
  • Instructional Supervisor: Michael Bobker, MS, CEM, Director CUNY Building Performance Lab
  • Office Hours: instructors will be available by appointment after classes (lunch and end of day)
Texts:
  • IUOE Indoor Air Quality Solutions for Stationary Engineers
  • Herzog, Peter Energy Efficient Operation of Commercial Buildings
  • BOC Handbooks - 105, 107
  • FEMP O&M Best Practices, release 3.0
Overall course desription:
The course’s learning objectives focus on the ability of building operators to pro-actively manage energy, water and indoor environmental quality within a planned maintenance framework.
  • Understand building mechanical and electrical systems, configurations and operating conditions and their implications for energy and indoor environmental quality (IEQ).
  • Identify, plan and implement improvements in operations and maintenance, especially as they relate to energy and the indoor environment.
  • Participate and communicate effectively in organizational processes for physical plant performance planning and improvements
  • Work quantitatively with energy and water data, system performance indicators and measures of IEQ.
  • Manage IAQ practices and conditions
  • Use on-line and web-based tools and resources

More specific Learning Objectives are associated with each section of the course and each class session.

CERTIFICATION: Building Operator Certification – Level 1
This 30 week, two-course sequence satisfies the training requirement of the nationally recognized BOC-Level 1.
  • Requirements and grading
    • Practical Projects (2) 40% (P = satisfactory work as evaluated by instructors)
    • Exams (6) 45% (P = 60%)
    • Attendance & Participation 15% (80% attendance is required minimum)
  • Assignments
    • Reading assignments should be completed for the class with which they are listed. The reading shown, for example, for week 2 should be completed before the week 2 class session. The instructor will be assuming that you have read the material.
    • Practicum Projects Two practical projects are required; one project for each 15-week course. Development of schematics and building data collection are emphasized; full detail of project requirements is provided separately. The projects should be based on the building with which the student is directly involved. A progress submission on the project is due at the end of every course module, ie – every 5th week.
    • Hand-held Instruments and Data-loggers will be demonstrated and used in class. They are available for loan for use in your facility in connection with your projects. Instruments must be signed out from the program office and must be returned and checked back in to the program office no more than two weeks from sign-out. DO NOT loan instruments to others; the person signing out an instrument will be held responsible for it.
    • Class Slides used in classes are to help you follow the lectures. They provide an outline and key points but do not contain everything that may be discussed in class. The slides will be available to you on the class website.

Weekly topics and reading assignments (30 weeks)
wkTopicIn-classReading
Building Systems: An energy and operations perspective
ASustainable High Performance Facilities: Maintaining The Learning Environment
1 Course Intro and Overview Dimensions of Building Performance & Why They Matter
2 Site Conditions and Mapping Identifying and documenting building and site conditions. Measurements with handheld instruments. Surveys

Exercise: site sketch with measurement and conditions notes
  • BOC 105 Handbook - pages 1 to 16
  • Herzog Chapter 1,2
  • US EPA IAQ Tools for Schools
  • See Additional Links for Further Learning below: Indoor Air Quality
3 Dimensions of Sustainability: Measuring Performance Working with rating systems, benchmarking and baselines of building performance

Exercise: Water Efficiency, calculating end-use and calibrating against meter readings
Demonstration: Data Loggers – video
4 Planned Maintenance Maintenance approaches & techniques —

Exercise/Discussion: Group review of Projects in context of annual planning – improvements in energy, heating, water, IE
  • IUOE text, Indoor Air Quality Solutions — Chapter 10
  • Recommended: FEMP Chapters 5 and Chapters 6
5 School Designs & New Technologies What to expect in HVAC, lighting, and renewable energy systems. How solar energy systems work.

Section Exam
Progress Project due
BLighting and Electric Power
6 Lighting Technology and Control Technology basics and energy

Exercise: Fixture wattage and spreadsheet lighting schedule
7 Lighting Quality and Maintenance Recognizing key elements for visual comfort, satisfaction and productivity

Exercise: Light level measurement
8 The Building Electrical System Basic electrical characteristics and typical system components, layouts and preventive maintenance.

Exercise: Electric System Schematic + PM
  • BOC 107 Handbook
9 Motors, On-site Generation and Demand Mgt Exercise: Group review of project work Motor construction and maintenance, on-site generation and managing peak demand.

Exercise: Considering what causes peaks and what can be controlled
10 Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Fundamental refrigeration principles and energy–related maintenance for common equipment

Section Exam
Progress Project due
CHeating & Ventilation
11 Loads and Building Dynamics How equipment is sized, how buildings respond and implications for operations

Exercise/Discussion: How do you determine your start-up and shut-down?
  • No reading assignment. Advise you get a jump on considering your project.
12 Boilers and Efficiency Key drivers of central plant efficiency

Exercise: Boiler room visit with survey form
13 Heating Distribution Managing distribution, even when not all the controls are working

Exercise: Steam distribution schematic (2nd boiler room visit)
14 Controls Control basics, terminology, principles. Sequences of Operation. Working with pneumatics and with DDC.

Exercise: Group review of projects.
  • IUOE chapter 12, 13

    Recommended: FEMP 9.11 (in the pdf, on the left column, click on "9.3 Steam Traps")
15 Ventilation and Air Distribution Systems How is ventilation air provided? What kinds of systems and quantities?

Exercise: Ventilation air quantity

Section Exam
Course project due
  • IUOE chapter 7 & 11
Principles Of Energy Management And Green Building Practices
AMaintenance For Indoor Air And Environmental Quality
16 Indoor Air Quality Sources and pathways. IAQ criteria, standards and regulations.

Exercise: Readings, project and survey
  • IUOE IAQ textbook Chapters 5, 7 & 11; IAQ Tools for Schools – Articles 1 to 5
17 IAQ Measurements What kinds of practices and measurements to maintain good IAQ and to troubleshoot?

Exercise: CO2 and other measurements
  • IUOE IAQ textbook Chapters 2, 3, 6 & 9;
    Recommended NECHPS O&M Guide pp 57-64 (see Schools Resources Bibliography for weblink)
18 IAQ / IEQ Protocols Documentation and communication

Exercise: IAQ Case Studies and Group review of projects
  • IUOE IAQ textbook Chapters 1, 4, 5 & 15
19 Maintenance Management Are we good maintenance managers?

Exercise:Planning preventive maintenance with lists and spreadsheets

Exercise:self-assessment using CIBSE tool
  • IUOE IAQ textbook Chapter 10; FEMP chapters 5 & 6
20 PM Targets for Improvement What might realistic PM improvement targets look like?

Exercise:integrating PM targets into the Annual Plan process

Section Exam
Progress Project due
  • Study for exam!
BEnergy Data, Benchmarking and Analytics
21 Energy sources & units Working with energy data

Exercise: Fuel-to-btu conversion and creating benchmarks
22 Performance Benchmarking How ESPM benchmarking works.

Exercise: Interpreting normalized data and ESPM computer lab
  • ESPM website: Overview, Benchmarking Starter, Source Energy, How the Rating System Works
23 Load Profiles & Trends What are load profiles and what can we tell from them over time?

Exercise: ESPM computer lab
  • Herzog chapters 4, 5
24 System Level Energy Usage Calculating consumption of systems and major equipment

Exercise: End-use allocation
  • Herzog chapters 4, 5 + Appendix B
25 Energy Improvement Targets What we can see about opportunities

Exercise: End-use allocation

Section Exam
Progress Project due
  • Herzog chapter 6
    Sample O&M Improvement Plan
CEnergy Improvement Processes
Energy Audits, Capital Projects & Retro-Commissioning
26 Energy Audits — Purpose, process, and calculations Purpose, process and calculation procedures of the energy audit

Demo: Audit calculations
27 Characterizing RCx and ECM projects Qualitative condition descriptions and basic quantification

Exercise: Boiler and heating improvement
28 Reading and using the energy audit report Steps and tips on using a full audit report.

Exercise: Goals from O&M and energy audit reports for goals into Annual Plan
29 Accepting Capital Projects Exercise: Group review of Projects Operating Manuals and energy specs.

Exercise: What you will look for in energy project hand-off
30 Closing Class Have we become better maintenance managers?

Section Exam
Course project due
Additional Links for Further Learning
DSF News
As recognition of the great work being done in NYC schools by sustainability coordinators, various organizations have awarded their efforts. Vicki Sando was named a Trailblazing Teacher by the Center for Green Schools, one of only six teachers nationwide to be honored for her creativity in bringing sustainability education to the classroom. As part of the reward, Ms. Sando will receive tools to further support her mission of teaching sustainability to her students.

Daniel Steiner received the Bronx Council for Environmental Quality (BCEQ) “Keeping it Reel” Formal Environmental Educator Award, as nominated by his Principal, Charles Gallo. The BCEQ is a non-profit dedicated to leaving the Bronx with “better air, land, and water quality than we have at present.” As part of that goal the organization works with schools to educate students on the importance of environmental issues facing their community.

Nathaniel Wright, a teacher at Bronx Design and Construction Academy, was awarded the Presidential Innovation Award for Environmental Educators (PIAEE). The White House Council on Environmental Quality, in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, recognizes “outstanding K-12 teachers who employ innovative approaches to environmental education and use the environment as a context for learning for their students.” Nathaniel was selected based on the work done with students including a green roof, lessons on food production and urban ecosystems, Urban Heat Island Effect and working with architectural students on sustainable building designs.

The NYC Department of Education is extremely proud of these three individuals and all the other sustainability coordinators working to bring green curriculum to the classroom!
After a year that saw tremendous growth for the city’s Sustainability Initiative, the annual Golden Apple Awards were given out to schools that showed exceptional results in recycling, reuse and clean up challenges. On hand to present the awards was DSNY Commissioner Kathryn Garcia and CEO of DSF John Shea. To read further about the great work being done in our schools, click here
Does your motivation come from a desire to serve others or serve yourself? The following article discusses the study of two different types of motivation and the intriguing findings that resulted. Click here to read.
Click here to read the Settlement Agreement.
The New York Times highlights the DOE’s efforts to compost school food citywide. Since the start of the program, in 2012, the program has expanded dramatically and plans to reach all five boroughs this fall. Click here to read the article.
On Monday, June 16th a kick-off celebration was held at Q650 - The High School for Construction Trades, Engineering and Architecture (HSCTEA) - to commemorate the installation of vacancy sensors. This year, through Solar One's Cleantech program, HSCTEA students had the opportunity to explore building performance and energy efficiency through a series of classroom activities and building audits. Two HSCTEA 11th grade Engineering students, Ashaki Gumbs and Scander Garcia, went a step further, taking the data from the building audits to write a report, which outlined how upgrades to school lighting could save energy and lower the school’s carbon footprint. Their report was submitted to the DOE Division of Facilities Sustainability Office. As a result, DSF funded a $95,000 vacancy sensors installation project in all classrooms and offices. The project was funded using revenue generated through DOE’s Demand Response Program, an initiative to curtail electric consumption during peak electric demand when utility grids are threatened by brownouts and blackouts. At Monday's event DSF technical staff and contractors discussed the project and its impact on the school community with HSCTEA Principal, Lakeisha Gordon, and Assistant Principal, Steven Wynn. Solar One’s Sarah Pidgeon presented Gumbs and Garcia with the Student Achievement Award for outstanding work in energy efficiency and sustainability. These dedicated students look forward to participating in future sustainability efforts at HSCTEA and continuing their education in engineering.
When making decisions in a large organization the status quo can be a guide, but should be questioned as circumstances change and evolve. Click here for video.
A doughnut shop worker decided to share his views on printing receipts by writing out a customized message on each slip of paper.

A Reddit writer known as “buckwheatwaffle” said he felt he was giving too many receipts that were simply a waste of paper. So he included a little note for each customer — a quote from comedian Mitch Hedberg.

“'I bought a donut and they gave me a free receipt for the donut. I don't need a receipt for a donut,” the receipt reads. “I give you money and you give me the donut, end of transaction. We don't need to bring ink and paper into this. I can't imagine a scenario that I would have to prove that I bought a donut.”

The worker believes printing a receipt for each doughnut is a waste of paper and energy. The worker — who claims to work for a Chicago store — later wrote that his boss even found humor in his quest to spread awareness.

BY Melanie Greenwood / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS / Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 9:15 AM
Click here to see how the Sustainability Initiative is working to build an eco-friendly school.
Mayor William de Blasio announces more than 4,200 new Full-Day Pre-K Seats added to public schools. Click here to read announcement.

Deputy Mayor Buery and Chancellor Fariña to lead School Space Working Group. Click here to read announcement.

Click here to read the Chancellor's testimony on the fiscal year 2015 budget before the NYC Council Committee on Education.
To the DSF Team:

With spring right around the corner, I thought I would take the time to recap the past few months here at the Division of School Facilities. It’s been a very important and dynamic time for New York City, and the Department of Education in particular.

With a new city government come new goals that directly impact the jobs we do on a daily basis. It gives our team the chance to highlight the great work we do on behalf of the children throughout the five boroughs. One of my responsibilities is advocating for the needs of each individual within DSF, which allows you to reach the high standards set by our department. This is a task that I take seriously and will continue to do going forward.

This winter season has been particularly harsh on school buildings. It seems like every day brought another record setting temperature, snowstorm or a combination of the two. However, I never doubted for a moment that our buildings would be well maintained, accessible and ready for learning. That is a testament to the hard work done by all involved.

Recently launched was the latest version of our Sustainability Newsletter. We are now reaching more partners than ever before and constantly re-thinking the way the DOE approaches sustainability. Additionally, our Emergency Operations Center here at Vernon Boulevard is nearing completion. This will allow us to become more proactive in monitoring external events that could have potential impacts to buildings, giving us an added advantage when faced with emergency scenarios.

In the last few months we’ve also initiated a new on-boarding process, worked with various departments to test panic buttons in every school and are currently overseeing custodial Coastal Storm Training. All of these tasks are in addition to the day-to-day responsibilities that make up our mission.

I am looking forward to what the next few months will bring for the city and our department. As long as we continue to live up to our standards, I have no doubt that we will continue to thrive.

Many thanks for all that you do every day on behalf of the students in New York City.

Regards,

John Shea, CEO Division of School Facilities
After 27 years of serving the City of New York, Frank Borowiec, most recently DSF’s Director of Facilities Management has decided to retire. Throughout his career Frank has held a number of positions within the Department of Education, starting by repairing window shades before rising through the ranks to become a supervisor of laborers, contract manager, Tweed building manager, Deputy Director of Facilities and, finally, his current role as Director of Facilities Management. Throughout his time at the DOE Frank has amassed countless productive working relationships, shown a strong work ethic toward all his responsibilities, a passion for the wellbeing of our students and teachers all with a sense of humor which brought a smile to every room he entered.

Frank will be retiring to Florida where he looks forward to working on his golf game, visits with his grandkids and, most importantly, spending time with his wife.
Through the DOE's organic collection program the City has been collecting food waste in cafeterias and converting it into compost, rather than sending it to landfills. Once converted to compost it can be sold to landscapers, turned into natural gas or donated to parks across the five boroughs. Sustainability efforts by the DOE are changing the way we recycle and reuse in schools on a daily basis.
In the linked article Cheryl Connor comments on clinical social worker Amy Morin’s belief on what things mentally strong people avoid and how this leads to their success. Click here to read.
Six big-city school systems are combining their purchasing power to persuade suppliers to sell healthier and more environment-friendly products, like compostable food trays, at low prices. To learn more click here.
Good Day New York recently aired a segment on the food being served in schools citywide. The show highlighted the great work being done by the School Food team and the healthy options available in cafeterias for all students. Take a few minutes and watch the segment by clicking here.
NYC, in an effort to double recycling rates to 30% by 2017, is increasing the number of sanitation officers around the city. These individuals will be enforcing the City’s recycling laws and monitoring both residential and business waste removal. Click here for the entire article.
The DSF is pleased to announce that Mr. Joseph Lazarus has been appointed as Director of Facilities, filling the vacancy created with the promotion of Bill Estelle to Executive Director. Joe has been serving the students of New York City for almost 14 years, starting as a Handyman, and most recently holding the position of Deputy Director of Facilities. Joe will be assigned to lead the Brooklyn North team. Please join me in welcoming Joe to his new position.
On November 20th John Shea, CEO of DSF, will be representing DOE on a panel discussion centered on small companies with great ideas that hope to gain the attention of large organizations. This discussion will give valuable insight and knowledge to small business operators and bring attention to the partnerships fostered between the public and private sectors. For more information please select the following link here.
On October 28th five DSF employees were honored by Deputy Chancellor Grimm to thank them for the great work they engage in on behalf of New York City schools and students. The honorees were Vincent Sisto (Custodial Engineer), Parmanand Ramphal (Bronx Borough Contract Manager), Lililya Shames (Deputy Director of Optimization), Meryl LaBella (Deputy Director of Procurement) and Harry Torkelsen (Borough Contract Manager). DSF is proud of all those recognized and thanks them for all their hard work and dedication.
To the DSF Team: As the school year moves forward, I wanted to take a moment and thank each of you for the exemplary effort you gave to ensure that our schools were ready for our 1.1 million students this fall. The work DSF does behind the scenes is crucial in allowing students to reach their potential in the classroom. I believe that our team is better than ever at meeting the needs of a city as demanding and diverse as New York.

Since 2002, we have opened 654 new schools to better serve our students. Many of those buildings were damaged by Superstorm Sandy. As we approach the one year anniversary of Sandy, the ingenuity that was shown by our entire department exemplifies the best that public service has to offer. Never in the history of DSF had one event affected the entire organization so drastically. It was inspiring to watch this past year as DSF helped to rebuild our facilities.

Our Sustainability Initiative has been a trailblazer in City government. New partnerships and programs aimed at meeting the goals of PlaNYC have allowed DSF to push forward on the Mayor’s environmental vision. This year begins our partnership with DSNY to promote composting in 200 schools, with the goal of all schools composting within three years. We continue to work with the Parks Department to ensure that every New Yorker is within a ten minute walk of a park. These programs, along with others for energy conservation, ecology, and green curriculum, show the level of importance the City of New York places on making the city a greener place to work, live and attend school.

In the coming year we will continue our progress in improving the way facilities are managed, repaired and modernized. Through partnerships with both city agencies and private organizations, we will hold fast to sustainability goals set out in PlaNYC, allowing our schools to become a model for other major urban school districts.

It is only when we work together that our goals can be accomplished. I look forward to the challenges ahead knowing that we will face them as a team, and continue to support our children in getting the education they deserve.

Many thanks,

John Shea, CEO Division of School Facilities
This article, click here, published by the New York Times in January of 1939, highlights the DOE’s construction of schools during the New Deal era. This expansion was the largest of its kind up to that point and showed NYC’s commitment to providing state of the art facilities to students throughout the five boroughs. It’s easy to see that many of the actions taken by DSF today mirror those from the city’s past.
Beginning in October John Shea, CEO of DSF, will have open office time scheduled on the first Tuesday of each month. This forum will give anyone within the organization the opportunity to speak directly with John about whatever is on their mind. These meetings will be held at 44-36 Vernon Blvd. in the 5th floor conference room and will be open to employees on a first-come, first-served basis by signing up via emailing Janet Fitzgibbon.

John looks forward to seeing staff at the first meeting to be held on October 1st.
This report located here tells what parents, teachers, and students said about learning conditions at the High School for Energy and Technology which is sponsored by the Division of School Facilities.
Click here to see ten really great employee traits that any good employer should recognize and reward instantly.
The International Facility Management Association (IFMA) and the IFMA Foundation are proud to announce the release of “Waste: A Comprehensive Guide to Waste Stream Management,” the latest free publication in the “Sustainability ‘How-to’ Guide Series” which provides facility managers with workable solutions to minimize waste.

“To recycle an old cliché, waste not, want not,” said Marina Badoian-Kriticos, sustainability director at IFMA. “The modern facility manager is under tremendous pressure to do more with less. One way to accomplish this is by managing the waste stream to reduce the amount of waste in the built environment. Waste flow management is one of the most profound examples of sustainable practices saving money, improving productivity and benefiting the triple bottom line for organizations around the world.”

Waste is defined loosely as the useless consumption or expenditure of resources. This not only encompasses the popular understanding of waste (in terms of energy and garbage), but wasted time and effort as well. Waste stream management is the process of tracking resources from the beginning to the end of their existence. Below is an excerpt from the executive summary of the guide:

This guide covers the use of resources from harvest through manufacture/production, transportation, use and disposal of materials. It discusses environmentally preferred purchasing programs, life cycle assessment and various disposal methods. It explains rapidly renewable resources, embedded energy, virtual water, package design, the effect of materials on indoor environmental quality, recycling, document destruction and landfills. It focuses on the four “Rs” — reduce, reuse, recycle and rethink — in managing resources and the waste products derived from them. Finally, the guide will show how managing resources throughout a product’s life cycle will save time and money.

Among the subjects covered in the free guide are:
• Best practices for conducting a waste audit
• A guide for environmentally preferred purchasing
• Best practices to reduce, reuse, recycle and rethink
• Tips for making the business case for waste reduction
• Detailed case studies

The peer-reviewed guide was co-written by Bill Conley, IFMA Fellow, CFM, SFP, FMP, CFMJ, LEED AP and Sharon Jaye, D.Ed., SFP.

Bill Conley has more than 35 years of experience in facility management. He has managed facilities for VeriFone, Hewlett-Packard and SCAN Health Plan, and has served as managing director of the LEED®/Sustainability Development Group for Pacific Building Care (PBC). He is past president of the Orange County (U.S.) Chapter of IFMA as well as the Facility Management Consultants Council and has served on the IFMA board of directors. He is a director on the board of OC IFMA and is a member of IFMA’s sustainability committee. He currently practices as a facility management/sustainability consultant through his own company, CFM2.

Sharon Jaye is the director of sustainability at the New York City Department of Education Division of School Facilities. She has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Clayton State University, a master’s degree in project management from the University of Wisconsin Platteville and a doctorate of education in educational leadership from Argosy University. She holds Sustainability Facility Professional accreditation through IFMA and currently serves on IFMA’s sustainability committee.

“Waste: A Comprehensive Guide to Waste Stream Management,” is available here online. free of charge. In total, 14 publications from the “Sustainability ‘How-to’ Guide Series” are available here online. The IFMA Foundation produced the guide in partnership with the IFMA Sustainability Committee.

Established in 1990 as a nonprofit 501(c)(3) corporation, the IFMA Foundation works for the public good to promote educational opportunities and research for the advancement of facility management. The IFMA Foundation is supported by the generosity of the facility management community, including IFMA members, chapters, councils, corporate sponsors and private contributors who are united by the belief that education and research improve the facility management profession.
DSF is excited to announce that, after a thorough search process, Mr. William Estelle has been appointed as the new Executive Director for DSF. Bill started his career with the Board of Education in June, 1975 and has held every field-based position in the Department from Cleaner through Custodian Engineer, and then on to Deputy Director and most recently the Director of Facilities for Brooklyn South/Staten Island. Bill has many years of diverse experience, as well as an unparalleled work ethic. Please join us in welcoming him in this new position.
In this article published on the Facilitiesnet website, John Shea and other FMXcellence winners share how they made a big impact on a large portfolio. John specifically speaks about the use of the SchoolStat application which uses data-driven analysis to target problem areas in schools. To read the full article CLICK HERE.
Linda Green, JD, MPA, Chief Administrative Officer at the DSF has once again been asked to participate on the "Diverse Career Opportunities for Your Law Degree” Panel which will be held on Tuesday, July 23rd at 6pm at Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.

This event is part of the Thurgood Marshall Summer Law Internship Program, which provides legal internship opportunities and development programs for inner-city high school students interested in pursuing a career in law. More information about the program is available at: CLICK HERE.
DSF is pleased to welcome Dr. Sharon Jaye to the Division of School Facilities as our new Director of Sustainability. She comes to us most recently from The Westminster Schools in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Jaye has her PhD in Educational Leadership, and did her dissertation work in Greenhouse Gas Emission inventories.
DSF would like to congratulate Deputy Director of Facilities Joe Lazarus who has been named one of the six 2013 Sloan Public Service Award winners. As Deputy Director of Facilities for Community School District 3, Joseph Lazarus oversees 50 Manhattan public schools located in 30 different buildings to ensure that 4 million square feet of school space is safe, clean and warm for teachers and students.

For over 38 years, the Fund has recognized City employees at all ranks and levels of government through its Sloan Public Service Awards, widely regarded as the Nobel Prizes of City government. This program annually honors six outstanding civil servants whose work performance and commitment to the public transcend not merely the ordinary but the extraordinary, day after day and year after year. In honoring these winners, the Fund also acknowledges the contributions of the many thousands of dedicated public servants who, with integrity and devotion, perform the work that keeps this complex city running. CLICK HERE. to view the video.
Management at DSF is proud to announce the release of its new Website. The redesign, which was extensive, tranformed the old outdated site into a fresh, new modern look.
The Division of School Facilities is pleased to announce our new on-line Third Party and Charter Request application. This replaces the old paper based submittal process and is for use by schools wishing to select and manage their own contractors, and for any work requested by a Charter School co-located in a DOE building. If you are on the DOE intranet (a DOE school) the application is available for your use HERE. If you are not on the DOE intranet (a Charter School for example), the application is available for your use HERE. The application allows you to enter a request and will keep you informed of the status of the request through regular email updates from the system as the request moves through the approval process. You can use your secure log-in (sent to you after your submission) to check the status of your request. Instructions on how to use the system are located within the system to make it easy to use. Please note: If you have already submitted a request DO NOT use the electronic submittal application.
Three New York State Schools were named among the Second Annual U.S. Dept. of Education Green Ribbon Schools.

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, together with White House Council on Environmental Quality Chair Nancy Sutley and Environmental Protection Agency Acting Administrator Bob Perciasepe announced that three New York schools – Crompond School, PS 057 Hubert H. Humphrey School and Rye Country Day School – are among the 14 districts and 64 schools named 2013 U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon Schools. New York State is among 29 states and D.C. with schools receiving the second annual awards.

U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon Schools is a federal recognition program that launched in September 2011. Selected schools are honored for their exemplary efforts to reduce environmental impact and utility costs, promote better health, and ensure effective environmental education, including civics and green career pathways.

Crompond School, Yorktown, NY lives up to its motto "Always Responsible, Never Excuses" with emphasis on individual responsibility and environmental consciousness including participation in the Ford Challenge to create a future car model that reduces the carbon footprint. PS 057 Hubert H. Humphrey School, Staten Island, NY provides students with project-based learning centered around environmental education including energy conservation, climate change, ecological restoration, composting, recycling and gardening. Rye Country Day School, Rye, NY provides a multi-faceted program focusing on energy and resource reduction, recycling, environmental activities, campus gardening, and community education.

"The Board of Regents and I congratulate the Crompond School, PS 057 Hubert H. Humphrey School and Rye Country Day School," said State Education Commissioner John B. King, Jr. "These three schools have demonstrated exemplary efforts to ensure a sustainable and 'green' school environment and the students, faculty and staff of each school deserve to be recognized for their work."

"Today’s honorees are modeling a comprehensive approach to being green," said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. "They are demonstrating ways schools can simultaneously cut costs; improve health, performance and equity; and provide an education geared toward the jobs of the future. In fact, the selected districts are saving millions of dollars as a result of their greening efforts. And the great thing is that the resources these honorees are using are available for free to all schools."

The 2013 Green Ribbon School honorees include 54 public schools and 10 private schools. In addition, 14 districts were honored for the first-ever District Sustainability Award. The public schools include seven charter, five magnet and four career and technical schools. The schools serve various grade levels, including 40 elementary, 23 middle and 19 high schools, with several schools having various K-12 configurations, from 29 states and the District of Columbia. Over half of the 2013 honorees serve a student body more than 40 percent of which is eligible for free and reduced price lunch. The list of all selected schools and districts, as well as their nomination packages, can be found here. A report with highlights on the 78 honorees can be found here.

"Preparing students for success in the 21st century economy begins in our schools. The schools and districts being honored today are modeling the best practices in reducing environmental impact and cutting costs, creating a healthier learning environment, and providing students with an education geared toward the jobs of the future," said Chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality Nancy Sutley.

"EPA is proud to join the Department of Education in recognizing our nation's U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon Schools for their remarkable efforts to create healthier learning spaces and educate students on the importance of environmental protection," said EPA Acting Administrator Bob Perciasepe. "U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon Schools are not only cutting costs thanks to energy-saving practices and use of more efficient technology, but they're also reducing instances of pollution-related illnesses like asthma, a leading cause of student absence. The students who attend these schools are better prepared than ever to become the next generation of environmental stewards and bring about a healthier, more sustainable future."
Dear Friends, I'd like to sing the praises of our Solar One educators and staff, whose work, dedication and considerable talent have made our Green Design Lab™ a stunning success. But don't take my word for it. The Wall Street Journal found the Green Design Lab™ so exciting they ran a feature article on it in the paper today. You can read the article as a PDF HERE. In fact, the Journal gave us double coverage, with a wonderful online video of our one-of-a-kind program: WATCH IT HERE.

Last year we tested the Green Design Lab™, our in-depth environmental education program that shows students how to green their school, in 10 NYC public schools. It quickly caught fire and will be in 30 public schools this year. These 30 schools will compete for $30,000 in prizes. The winners will be the top 3 to show the biggest reduction in electricity use (kW hours). Facing tough budget cuts, schools are taking our Energy Challenge very seriously. Please read the Journal's report on our Green Design Lab™, I'm positive you'll find it informative and inspiring- we really appreciate the wonderful work that journalist Sophia Hollander did on this piece. And many, many thanks to everyone who has supported our effort to green schools, lower their energy bills and improve our students' STEM (science, technology, energy and math) skills.

Sincerely,

Chris Collins
Executive Director
The New York State Office of General Services (OGS), under the leadership of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, is pleased to provide this website for use by institutions and the general public. Its purpose is to offer facility managers, school administrators, educators, parents, and citizens a wealth of free information and tools to promote adoption of effective green cleaning practices, leading to healthier indoor environments
Frequently Asked Questions

Click the question to get the answer...

What Are We Responsible For?

There is often confusion regarding the role of the DSF and the School Construction Authority (SCA). The SCA builds new public schools and manages the repair and renovation of large capital construction projects. The DSF is primarily responsible for the maintenance, repair, and the safe, efficient operation of over 1,400 buildings that make up the Department of Education infrastructure. This would include cleaning, garbage disposal, heating, air conditioning, plumbing, carpentry, painting, minor repairs, environmental health and safety and all other aspects of building maintenance. In other words, the SCA builds it; we maintain and repair it. If, for example, a roof leaks, the DSF will fix the leak; if a roof needs to be replaced, that’s a job for SCA.

DSF manages its repairs and maintenance through a software application known as PassPort. This maintenance management system tracks all repair requests and monitors the progress of those jobs until their completion. To make repairs that fall outside the scope of work of our on site custodial staff, DSF relies on its own in-house workforce of some 700 skilled trades’ people as well as private contractors. All work is carefully monitored for quality and cost by DSF construction management professionals.

How do schools get repairs done?

The Division of School Facilities partners with schools to ensure all New York City public schools are safe and welcoming environments for student learning. This partnership involves two work streams: general maintenance and improvement projects.

General maintenance includes the day-to-day operations of the facility and repair or replacement of equipment due to normal wear and tear of the operating components of the building’s facility and grounds. This work stream is generally led by the school-based Custodian Engineer or Building Manager in consultation with the Principal and the school’s Deputy Director of Facilities. These functions are funded out of the Division of School Facilities' general operating budget; additional funding is not required from the school.

Improvement projects are initiatives not necessary for the general maintenance of the building but rather involve optional work which enhances or improves the facility. These projects are determined by the principal and funded solely from the school's discretionary budget. Given the challenging and time-consuming nature of managing a construction project which includes developing a scope of work and cost estimate as well as ensuring health, safety, labor law and building code regulations are being followed the Division of School Facilities is prepared to help schools initiate and manage school these projects for them. DSF calls this program the Market Maker program.

Management: Division of School Facilities Contract Managers are experienced professionals available to help schools initiate and manage school improvement projects. After an initial consultation, they will:

  • secure a contracted vendor
  • prepare a scope of work, including project cost
  • issue a proceed notice to the contractor, upon agreement of scope and price
  • inspect the work
  • ensure that the contractor conforms to standard maintenance and repair requirements (labor law, insurance, dust protocol, building code, etc.)
  • approve the contractor's application for payment

Cost: Most DSF Improvement Projects may range from $500 up to $100,000. If your project exceeds that amount, please feel free to contact Mark David (mdavid@schools.nyc.gov).

How can DOE School make Market Maker improvements?
  • Request a consultation
    Schools interested in exploring optional school improvement projects should contact their Custodian Engineer, Building Manager and/or school’s Deputy Director of Facilities (DDF).

    The Custodian Engineer, Building Manager, or DDF will enter the work request into the Division of School Facilities’ Maintenance Management System to initiate the request.
  • Work with a DSF Contract Manager
    A DSF Contract Manager will visit the school to develop, a scope of work, cost estimate and timeline for the project based on the school’s initial request and budget.
  • As many of these improvement projects include increasing the use of energy through the installation of air conditioning, smartboards or other technology it is important to remember that before any of these projects are performed DSF’s Office of Sustainability must first approve the project. The school’s DDF will assist in making this request to this Office.
  • Review and approve the project
    Once the DSF Contract Manager provides a scope of work and cost estimate, the principal reviews it for final approval.

    If the principal determines the school cannot afford to fund the project at the current time the quote will be honored by DSF through the end of the fiscal year.
  • Purchase Order Issued
    Once the project has been approved, the principal uses FAMIS to issue a purchase order to the Division of School Facilities (DSF) to pay for the project using the following process:

    • Schedule funds in Galaxy, almost always in object code 0676
    • Log into FAMIS
    • Go to Purchasing
    • Go to Contracted
    • Click on the NON-LIST-LINK and generate a PO to DSF using Vendor Code FAC000001 (Vendor Name: “Facilities Enhancements” ). Schools will go thru the same process to generate a PO to DSF as they would go through to generate a PO to any other contracted external professional services vendor except schools do not need to obtain competitive bids in order to generate a PO to DSF.
  • Schools cannot fund this project using grant money or funds emanating from the Department’s reimbursable codes (U /A 481/482) as DSF does not have the ability to access those accounts.
    • Once the PO is approved by the principal and/or its Network, DSF is electronically notified it has been given a PO and the Division’s Maintenance team can begin work.

      If assistance is required to generate the Purchase Order, schools should contact their Network leader for budget and accounting or DSF’s Finance office.
  • Work begins
    Once DSF receives the PO it authorizes DSF’s contractor to begin the project.
  • Approve the finished work
    After the work has been completed, the contract manager approves the vendor’s application for payment and pays the vendor using the funds provided to DSF by the school through its Purchase Order to DSF.
How can DOE School make Third Party improvements?

Third Party Agreements:

  • What is a Third Party Agreement?
    Third Party Agreements are for work which will be performed under the supervision of an individual selected by the responsible school or organization, and where the work will be done by a contractor selected by the school/organization and where the contractor does not have a direct contract for the work issued by the Department. The School or Organization (or others such as the school's Parents Association or a non-profit organization) will fund the project and is solely responsible for paying the contractor(s) for the work.
  • Why is a Third Party Agreement needed?
    Contractors working in our buildings need to be licensed (where required), have appropriate insurance for the protection of the Department, know our requirements for Dust Control and safety, use materials that are equal to or better than our standards, and follow all code requirements. The Third Party process and final agreement assures that these requirements are known and agreed to by your selected contractor.
  • Why is Funding Source information needed?
    If the work is funded by public (school or district) funds, then the work must be solicited in accordance with the Department's bidding procedures with appropriate documentation of your adherence to the procedures. Where the source of funds for the work to be performed comes from private sources, such as Alumni associations, Parents Associations, a Foundation, an individual, or a corporation, vendor selection is not subject to the SOPM requirements for solicitation of bids.
  • Why is the type of work required?
    Where required by code, the contractor performing the work must have a license for the work and be identified in the submittal. When the work requires filing with the Department of Buildings or other City agency, the school is responsible for engaging and paying for the services of the registered professional to design and file the work.
  • Why is the full scope and description of the work needed?
    You must have a full description of the work to be done. The scope of work submitted should reference the materials or equipment to be used (manufacturer's make and model for example). We strongly suggest that you and your contractors review the approved items for the type of work being done. These may be checked by going to the New York City School Construction Authority website In addition, The Chancellor has issued regulations regarding environmental sustainability in our schools. If electrical installations, upgrades or other projects are proposed that will increase the power consumption in the building, an energy plan will be required to show how the potential energy increase will be offset by school conservation measures to insure that there is no net increase of energy use in the building.
  • Why is it necessary to identify a Contract Manager?
    Your contractors must pay the prevailing rate for the trade doing the work. By law the party engaging a contractor on prevailing wage must designate someone to be responsible for obtaining and checking Certified Payroll Forms from the contractor indicating the hours, wages, and benefits paid to the employees of the contractor who worked on the project. These forms need to be kept on file at the school after completion of the work.
    NOTE: the NYC Comptroller requires that owners and partners performing covered work on jobs requiring the payment of prevailing wages be paid the prevailing rate for any hours so worked.
  • What is the Third Party Process?
    The process is outlined below:
    • The process begins when the school or organization initiates a third party request in the application. See link below to start a request.
    • You will be asked for information on your organization, what work you want to have done, the locations where work will be done, the contractor who will do the work, the cost of the work, whether the work will change the use of the space or the grade using the space, etc.
    • Your request will be routed for the required approvals to: The principal of the school in which the work will be done and after approval by the Principal to the Director of Facilities and (if change of use/grade is requested) to the Director of Space Planning. Once approved, your request will be checked with regard to and approvals will be entered for items such as:
      • Contractor information including licenses, liens, previous issues with other City Agencies
      • Whether the contractor has appropriate and required insurance
      • To make sure your contractor is aware of the specific requirements of the Dust Control Protocol established for the safety of students and staff
      • Presence of ACM and/or LBP that will be disturbed by the work to be done
      • Materials being installed meet or exceed the Department’s minimum quality requirements for the items to be installed
      • If the project will potentially increase the energy use in the building, the request will also be routed to the DSF Director of Sustainability.
    • You may be asked for additional information that we need to review your request. You will be notified and reminded if you have not gotten back to us with the information we need.
    • Once all the approvals are in place, you will be sent a copy of the final agreement which you will need to have signed and returned to DSF before work can start.
    • After work is completed, you will be required to forward us a signed “Certificate of Completion” which can be found on the last page of the Standard Agreement.
  • To submit an Initial Request click here
How can Charter Schools make Third Party improvements?

Charter Third Party Agreements:

  • What is a Third Party Agreement?
    Third Party Agreements are for work which will be performed under the supervision of an individual selected by you and your Charter Organization, and where the work will be done by a contractor selected by your Charter Organization and where the contractor does not have a direct contract for the work issued by the Department. The Charter will fund the project and is solely responsible for paying the contractor(s) for the work.
  • I already have to enter a request for approval of the work, why do I need a Third Party Agreement too?
    If you have submitted a request using the existing .pdf submittal process, and you want to select and manage the contractor performing the work for you, then DSF needs to be sure that Contractors working in our buildings are licensed (where required), have appropriate insurance for the protection of the Department, know our requirements for Dust Control and safety, use materials that are equal to or better than our standards, and follow all code requirements. The Third Party process and final agreement assures that these requirements are known and agreed to by your selected contractor. If you use the new on-line application, the request for work and the Third Party submittal share the same data entry screens and there is no need to enter a separate request.
  • Why is Funding Source information needed?
    If the work is funded by public (school or district) funds, then the work must be solicited in accordance with the Department's bidding procedures with appropriate documentation of your adherence to the procedures. Where the source of funds for the work to be performed comes from private sources, such as Alumni associations, Parents Associations, a Foundation, an individual, or a corporation, vendor selection is not subject to the SOPM requirements for solicitation of bids.
  • Why is Funding Source information needed?
    If the work is funded by public (school or district) funds, then the work must be solicited in accordance with public bidding procedures with appropriate documentation of your adherence to the procedures. Where the source of funds for the work to be performed comes from private sources, vendor selection is not subject to the SOPM requirements for solicitation of bids.
  • Why is the type of work required?
    Where required by code, the contractor performing the work must have a license for the work and be identified in the submittal. When the work requires filing with the Department of Buildings or other City agency, the Charter is responsible for engaging and paying for the services of the registered professional to design and file the work.
  • Why is it necessary to identify a Contract Manager?
    Your contractors must pay the prevailing rate for the trade doing the work. Corporate Counsel, based on the Appellate Court decision in the Pyramid Development case, has informed us that Charter Schools are subject to prevailing wage payment requirements for work in a City owned building or property.

    By law the party engaging a contractor on prevailing wage must designate someone to be responsible for obtaining and checking Certified Payroll Forms from the contractor indicating the hours, wages, and benefits paid to the employees of the contractor who worked on the project. These forms need to be kept on file at the school after completion of the work. NOTE: the NYC Comptroller requires that owners and partners performing covered work on jobs requiring the payment of prevailing wages be paid the prevailing rate for any hours so worked.
  • What is the Third Party Process?
    The process is outlined below:
    • The process begins when the school or organization initiates a third party request in the application. See link below to start a request.
    • You will be asked for information on your organization, what work you want to have done, the locations where work will be done, the contractor who will do the work, the cost of the work, whether the work will change the use of the space or the grade using the space, etc.
    • Your request will be routed for the required approvals to: The principal of the school in which the work will be done and after approval by the Principal to the Director of Facilities and (if change of use/grade is requested) to the Director of Space Planning. Once approved, your request will be checked with regard to and approvals will be entered for items such as:
      • Contractor information including licenses, liens, previous issues with other City Agencies
      • Whether the contractor has appropriate and required insurance
      • To make sure your contractor is aware of the specific requirements of the Dust Control Protocol established for the safety of students and staff
      • Presence of ACM and/or LBP that will be disturbed by the work to be done
      • Materials being installed meet or exceed the Department’s minimum quality requirements for the items to be installed
      • If the project will potentially increase the energy use in the building, the request will also be routed to the DSF Director of Sustainability.
    • You may be asked for additional information that we need to review your request. You will be notified and reminded if you have not gotten back to us with the information we need.
    • Once all the approvals are in place, you will be sent a copy of the final agreement which you will need to have signed and returned to DSF before work can start.
    • After work is completed, you will be required to forward us a signed “Certificate of Completion” which can be found on the last page of the Standard Agreement.
  • Charter Schools on the DOE Network click hereTo submit an Initial Request
    Charter Schools not on the DOE Network click hereTo submit an Initial Request
How do I report a problem?

Immediate emergencies, especially life threatening emergencies, or those involving urgent, time-critical issues of health and safety should always be reported to 911.

The public can report routine maintenance problems, or make other inquiries via 311, or contact the DSF directly. Click here to view the DSF Contact List.

A tree or its branches look like they may fall, what should I do?

The location of the tree is critical in determining what action should be taken. If the tree is located on the street, the Department of Parks has the responsibility for the tree. Click on the link to Report Tree Problem to Parks. If the problem is inside the fences of the school, please report the problem to the Custodian Engineer for appropriate action.

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