Division of School Facilities


Vendors & Contractors
Programs & Initiatives

Sustainability Initiative

Health & Safety

Standing Water

The Division of School Facilities has developed a Standing Water Management Plan to mitigate risks associated with diseases that are caused by mosquitoes. The Plan outlines the best practices and procedures to be followed by Custodian Engineers and Building Managers, to avoid ponding before a rain event and abate standing water 48-72 hours after a rain event, or other operational activities that can lead to standing water.

This Plan complies with the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s (DoHMH) regulation (Title 24: Department of Health and Mental Hygiene - New York City Health Codes - Title IV: Environmental Sanitation› Part B: Control of Environment› Article 151: Rodents, Insects and Other Pests. Click here for NYC Rules) governing standing water.

For additional information please visit the DoHMH website at:http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/health/health-topics/zika-virus.page

Cooling Tower Water Management Plan

This plan provides specific guidelines and requirements that will ensure the clean and safe operation and maintenance of the cooling towers associated with the school’s cooling system to prevent and minimize the risk of Legionella contamination.

Local Law 12

The New York City Department of Education monitors and addresses environmental concerns in or adjacent to NYC school buildings involving groundwater, ambient air, gas, soil, soil gas, and dust which may affect students and staff occupying NYC school buildings.

Click the link to view the report:

AHERA - Asbestos

Asbestos Hazardous Emergency Response Act requires public and private non-profit primary and secondary schools to inspect their buildings for asbestos-containing building materials.

In 1986, the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (commonly referred to as AHERA) was signed into law. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has published regulations that require schools subject to AHERA to:

  • Perform an original inspection and periodic re-inspections every 3 years for asbestos containing material
  • Develop, maintain, and update an asbestos management plan and keep a copy at the school
  • Provide yearly notification to parent, teacher, and employee organizations regarding the availability of the school's asbestos management plan and any asbestos abatement actions taken or planned in the school
  • Designate a contact person to ensure the responsibilities of the local education agency are properly implemented
  • Perform periodic surveillance of known or suspected asbestos containing building material
  • Provide custodial staff with asbestos awareness training

Training

Useful links

Related Documents

PCB's

In recent years, EPA has learned that caulk containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was used in many buildings, including schools built between 1950 and 1978. Although this is an important issue, the potential presence of PCBs in school buildings of this age can be addressed in part by implementing Best Management Practices (BMPs).

Water Testing

The purpose of this program is to ensure, to the extent feasible, that the water use for consumption in New York City’s (NYC) public schools meet the Federal acceptable lead in drinking water level of equal or less than 0.020mg/L (< 0.020mg/L) set by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – Lead in Drinking Water in Schools and Non- Residential Buildings (EPA 812-B-94-002 April 1994).

  • Lead in Drinking Water Program for New York City Public Schools

    This program manual demonstrates how the water use for consumption in NYC’s public schools will be tested and how lead contamination problems will be addressed if found. In addition, this program manual outlines the interim preventive measures that the NYC Department of Education (DOE) is taking to reduce the potential of lead in drinking water exposure to its building's occupants. Furthermore, this manual provides procedures under which the test results will be reported and made available to students, parents, teachers, school principals and custodian engineers.
    This program manual is intended for use by school officials and personnel responsible for the maintenance and/or safety of the DOE facilities and by the DOE consultants and laboratories performing the water sampling and analysis.
    Lead in Drinking Water Program for New York City Public Schools Manual (pdf)

  • Lead Poisoning Prevention Program

    The mission of the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program of the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) is to prevent and control childhood lead poisoning.
    Visit the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Lead Poisoning Prevention Program page by clicking on the link below:
    The NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene: The Lead Poisoning Prevention Program

  • Potable Water Sampling Protocol For Lead Concentration in New York City Board of Education Elementary School Buildings

    This Elementary School Sampling Protocol (hereinafter the “protocol”) is based on EPA Guidance 812-B-94-002, dated April 1994, Lead in Drinking Water in Schools and Non-Residential Buildings (hereinafter, the “EPA Guidance”). The purpose of this Protocol is to collect, analyze and measure the concentration of lead in potable water in New York City Board of Education (NYCBOE) Elementary School Buildings. Initially, the Elementary School Sampling Protocol will be used to sample drinking water outlets at elementary schools that were not investigated as of May 31, 2002.
    The NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene: The Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (pdf)

  • Potable Water Sampling for Lead Concentration Sample Collection Form

    Potable Water Sampling for Lead Concentration Sample Collection Form (pdf)

  • Do not drink from this faucet signage

    Do not drink from this faucet signage (pdf)

Dust Control

The New York City Department of Education (DOE) is committed to providing a safe and healthy work environment for its employees, contractors and subcontractors, as well to the students, teachers, school staff and to all those who utilizes their school buildings.


Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) are being implemented by the DOE in order to ensure its commitment to providing a safe and healthy work environment and compliance with all applicable rules and regulations when Asbestos Containing Building Material (ACBM) and Lead-Based Paint (LBP) are disturbed. These SOPs are effective immediately and are designed to avoid any improper removal or disturbance of ACBM and/or LBP. These new procedures are to be followed by any individual who is going to perform any work in a NYC school building that will impact in any way any of the existing building materials.


Click on the link to view the Standard Operating Procedures for Dust control

Mold Remediation

Guidelines for the remediation/cleanup of mold and moisture problems in schools.

On May 7, 1993, the New York City Department of Health (DOH), the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA), and the Mt. Sinai Occupational Health Clinic convened an expert panel on Stachybotrys atra in Indoor Environments. The purpose of the panel was to develop policies for medical and environmental evaluation and intervention to address Stachybotrys atra (now known as Stachybotrys chartarum (SC)) contamination. The original guidelines were developed because of mold growth problems in several New York City buildings in the early 1990's. This document revises and expands the original guidelines to include all fungi (mold). It is based both on a review of the literature regarding fungi and on comments obtained by a review panel consisting of experts in the fields of microbiology and health sciences.

For more information, please visit New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene.


Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings
Concern about indoor exposure to mold has been increasing as the public becomes aware that exposure to mold can cause a variety of health effects and symptoms, including allergic reactions. This document presents guidelines for the remediation/cleanup of mold and moisture problems in schools and commercial buildings; these guidelines include measures designed to protect the health of building occupants and remediators.

For more information, please visit The United States Environmental Protection Agency.

Pest Control

Bed bugs can be found in many public places. Although people can unknowingly carry bed bugs with them into a school building, schools are not a friendly environment for bed bugs to live and reproduce.

The Department of Education is committed to identifying pests, providing thorough inspections of schools, and having licensed pest control specialists treat rooms as appropriate. The Bed Bug Information Kit contains instructions about submitting a suspected bed bug for identification and information about inspections and treatment provided by the DOE Pest Management Unit.,

If a specimen found in a school is confirmed by the Pest Management Unit to be a bed bug, principals may notify parents using the letter in the Kit, which is also available in Bengali, Chinese, French, Haitian-Creole, Korean, Russian and Spanish.

For more information:

If the DOE Pest Management Unit finds that a school is infested (bed bugs living and reproducing in an area), parents of all the students in the building will be notified and DOE will provide the appropriate treatment in the affected school areas.

Mercury Removal

By federal law, it will be illegal to export elemental mercury from the United States after the end of 2012

Visit the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for additional information on:

Mercury Removal in Schools:

SchoolStat

The SchoolStat system is a multi-modular application supporting the administration and conduct of facility inspections and the processing and presentation of inspection data.

What are SchoolStat’s features, functionality and benefits?

The SchoolStat system is a multi-modular application supporting the administration and conduct of facility inspections and the processing and presentation of inspection data.

The Inspection Administration Module permits effective and efficient scheduling of 10 full-time inspectors, ensuring assignments are of uniform size, travel time between sites is minimized and inspectors are rotated across the city.

The tablet-based Data Collection Module enables the mobile collection of multiple data streams (questionnaire responses, free text entry, digital imagery) and their integration into seamless inspection records. These records are subsequently transferred into a central database, reviewed for administrative completeness and stored.

The Scoring Module takes inspection data collected through questionnaire responses and synthesizes them into numerical scores by a series of algorithms. These scores allow comparison of different facilities across time and space, and analysis of causal factors. Scores are further rolled up across facilities to enable analysis of managerial effectiveness, resource allocation etc.

Finally, the SchoolStat website provides users with the ability to review both scores and underlying inspection observations (including text comments and digital photographs) using hyper-linked drill downs. Moreover, data may be reviewed with multivariate queries, downloaded for further analysis or e-mailed directly from the web site.

What business problem does SchoolStat solve?

SchoolStat is a program created to conduct periodic, non-technical, visual inspections of all school facilities. Other programs in the New York City Department of Education exist to provide detailed technical information regarding school facilities, however there was an unmet need for non-technical information, i.e., how the results of our facility maintenance and operations efforts appear to engaged, objective visitors who are not trained facilities professionals. Moreover, in the past the only operational information available regarding the state of our facilities was either anecdotal or subjective or inferential and retrospective. SchoolStat, however, provides data (not anecdotes), uniformly, on all sites, 3-4 times each year, with the results of each inspection available for review and action in near-real time.

Information technology is absolutely essential to the SchoolStat program - managing an inspection program of this scope and scale would be difficult and effective analysis of inspection results impossible, without it. The nominated application is the means by which SchoolStat inspection data is collected and processed in order to provide current, actionable intelligence regarding the state of facilities across the +1,000 sites where New York City public schools are located.

How has the business process been improved as a result of SchoolStat?

While SchoolStat's initial deployment is relatively recent, its impact has been both immediate and far-reaching.

The potential of this program to help drive improvement in the condition of our facilities is enormous and being realized daily, as conditions in facilities across the city may now be and are readily compared. Managers have vastly increased visibility of the conditions of the facilities in their charge and, as has been noted previously, the data available to them is updated continuously and made available in near-real time. The program has fostered increased accountability as senior managers review their subordinates' scores and, moreover, a healthy sense of competition and pride among managers as their facilities' scores are visible to their peers.

In addition to increasing overall managerial effectiveness, inspection data can be used for more detailed analysis. For example, the incidence of specific deficiencies may be analyzed both within sites, between sites, across time or in combination. Such analyses can guide technical decisions concerning maintenance and custodial methods and materials. Whereas in the past such analyses depended on discrete studies, SchoolStat now provides an on-going source of objective data.

The possibilities are immense and will only grow as a data time series is built.

What has been the economic benefit of SchoolStat?

The primary aim of the SchoolStat project is to provide current, objective data regarding the condition of our school facilities. This data is not intended to help us either spend less or avoid spending more at the macro level, but to raise our schools' facility conditions to the highest possible level given available resources.

Thus, the total economic benefit of this project doesn't derive from cost savings or cost avoidance, but from assistance in spending what we have as wisely as possible, through improving managerial oversight and guiding resource allocation.

Who benefits from the use of SchoolStat?

The ultimate beneficiaries of this project, of course, are the schoolchildren attending New York City's public schools: they, and the Department of Education's school-based professionals, benefit from the improved facility conditions resulting from use of SchoolStat-collected data.

The most direct beneficiaries of the project, however, are the managers within the Division of School Facilities who use the SchoolStat system to improve the operations and maintenance of the facilities under their stewardship. They benefit both from the SchoolStat project's data and from the use of the application presenting that data.

Finally, the most direct beneficiaries of the application alone are the administrators and inspectors of the SchoolStat unit, whose tasks would be tremendously more onerous if the nominated application were not available to assist them.

Who do I contact with a question?

Please contact Gaindaa Sawh at either (718) 707-4308 or GSawh@schools.nyc.gov

Improvement Projects

New York City Public School Principals now have the power to choose and gain access to more resources for enhancing public school facilities through a partnership with The Division of School Facilities.
How can New York City Public School Principals make improvements to their schools?
About Market Maker Projects

The Division of School Facilities partners with schools to ensure all New York City public schools are safe and welcoming environments for student learning. This partnership involves two work streams: general maintenance and improvement projects.

General maintenance includes the day-to-day operations of the facility and repair or replacement of equipment due to normal wear and tear of the operating components of the building’s facility and grounds. This work stream is generally led by the school-based Custodian Engineer or Building Manager in consultation with the Principal and the school’s Deputy Director of Facilities. These functions are funded out of the Division of School Facilities' general operating budget; additional funding is not required from the school.

Improvement projects are initiatives not necessary for the general maintenance of the building but rather involve optional work which enhances or improves the facility. These projects are determined by the principal and funded solely from the school's discretionary budget. Given the challenging and time-consuming nature of managing a construction project which includes developing a scope of work and cost estimate as well as ensuring health, safety, labor law and building code regulations are being followed the Division of School Facilities is prepared to help schools initiate and manage school these projects for them. DSF calls this program the Market Maker program.

Management: Division of School Facilities Contract Managers are experienced professionals available to help schools initiate and manage school improvement projects. After an initial consultation, they will:

  • secure a contracted vendor
  • prepare a scope of work, including project cost
  • issue a proceed notice to the contractor, upon agreement of scope and price
  • inspect the work
  • ensure that the contractor conforms to standard maintenance and repair requirements (labor law, insurance, dust protocol, building code, etc.)
  • approve the contractor's application for payment

Cost: Most DSF Improvement Projects may range from $500 up to $100,000. If your project exceeds that amount, please feel free to contact Mark David (mdavid@schools.nyc.gov).

Market Maker Process for DOE Schools
  • Request a consultation
    Schools interested in exploring optional school improvement projects should contact their Custodian Engineer, Building Manager and/or school’s Deputy Director of Facilities (DDF).

    The Custodian Engineer, Building Manager, or DDF will enter the work request into the Division of School Facilities’ Maintenance Management System to initiate the request.
  • Work with a DSF Contract Manager
    A DSF Contract Manager will visit the school to develop, a scope of work, cost estimate and timeline for the project based on the school’s initial request and budget.
  • As many of these improvement projects include increasing the use of energy through the installation of air conditioning, smartboards or other technology it is important to remember that before any of these projects are performed DSF’s Office of Sustainability must first approve the project. The school’s DDF will assist in making this request to this Office.
  • Review and approve the project
    Once the DSF Contract Manager provides a scope of work and cost estimate, the principal reviews it for final approval.

    If the principal determines the school cannot afford to fund the project at the current time the quote will be honored by DSF through the end of the fiscal year.
  • Purchase Order Issued
    Once the project has been approved, the principal uses FAMIS to issue a purchase order to the Division of School Facilities (DSF) to pay for the project using the following process:

    • Schedule funds in Galaxy, almost always in object code 0676
    • Log into FAMIS
    • Go to Purchasing
    • Go to Contracted
    • Click on the NON-LIST-LINK and generate a PO to DSF using Vendor Code FAC000001 (Vendor Name: “Facilities Enhancements” ). Schools will go thru the same process to generate a PO to DSF as they would go through to generate a PO to any other contracted external professional services vendor except schools do not need to obtain competitive bids in order to generate a PO to DSF.
  • Schools cannot fund this project using grant money or funds emanating from the Department’s reimbursable codes (U /A 481/482) as DSF does not have the ability to access those accounts.
    • Once the PO is approved by the principal and/or its Network, DSF is electronically notified it has been given a PO and the Division’s Maintenance team can begin work.

      If assistance is required to generate the Purchase Order, schools should contact their Network leader for budget and accounting or DSF’s Finance office.
  • Work begins
    Once DSF receives the PO it authorizes DSF’s contractor to begin the project.
  • Approve the finished work
    After the work has been completed, the contract manager approves the vendor’s application for payment and pays the vendor using the funds provided to DSF by the school through its Purchase Order to DSF.
Charter Schools Partner with DSF

Charter Partnering with DSF for an Improvement

  • Request a consultation
    Charter Organizations interested in exploring optional school improvement projects should contact their Custodian Engineer, Building Manager and/or school’s Deputy Director of Facilities (DDF). The Custodian Engineer, Building Manager, or DDF will enter the work request into the Division of School Facilities’ Maintenance Management System to initiate the request.
  • Work with a DSF Contract Manager
    A DSF Contract Manager will visit the school to develop, a scope of work, cost estimate and timeline for the project based on the school’s initial request and budget.
    • As many of these improvement projects include increasing the use of energy through the installation of air conditioning, smartboards or other technology it is important to remember that before any of these projects are performed DSF’s Office of Sustainability must first approve the project. The school’s DDF will assist in making this request to this Office.
  • Review and approval of the project
    Once the DSF Contract Manager provides a scope of work and cost estimate, if you want the work to be done, you will need to enter a request for approval for the work into the Charter Work Request Application. Work in your areas may trigger Charter Matching requirements which have to be planned and budgeted for by the Department. Your request must be approved by the Office of Space Planning, the Director of Facilities, and the Chancellor before work can be done.

    The quote will be honored by DSF through the end of the fiscal year, which should be more than sufficient time for the approval process.
  • Deposit Check
    Once the project has been approved, you will need to contact Mark David, DSF’s Director of Finance at (mdavid@schools.nyc.gov) to discuss payment terms and conditions.
  • Work begins
    Once DSF receives payment, it authorizes DSF’s contractor to begin the project.
  • Approve the finished work
    After the work has been completed, and the contract manager approves the vendor’s application for payment, you will be billed for the outstanding balance of any project costs.
DOE/Charter Schools Partner with Third Party Contractor

Work with contractors through third party agreements

Third Party Agreements are for work which will be performed under the supervision of an individual selected by the responsible school or organization, and where the work will be done by a contractor selected by the school/organization and where the contractor does not have a direct contract for the work issued by the Department. The School or Organization (or others such as the school's Parents Association or a non-profit organization) will fund the project and is solely responsible for paying the contractor(s) for the work.

If the work is funded by public (school or district) funds, then the work must be solicited in accordance with the Department's bidding procedures with appropriate documentation of adherence to the procedures. Where the source of funds for the work to be performed comes from private sources, such as Alumni associations, Parents Associations, a Foundation, an individual, or a corporation, vendor selection is not subject to the SOPM requirements for solicitation of bids.

Where required by code the contractor performing the work must have a license for the work and be designated in the submittal. When the work requires filing with the Department of Buildings or other City agency, the school is responsible for engaging and paying for the services of the registered professional to design and file the work.

You must have a full description of the work to be done. The scope of work submitted should reference the materials or equipment to be used (manufacturer's make and model for example). We strongly suggest that you and your contractors review the approved items for the type of work being done. These may be checked by going to the New York City School Construction Authority website at: http://www.nycsca.org/Business/WorkingWithTheSCA/Design/Pages/Specifications.aspx

Your contractors must pay the prevailing rate for the trade doing the work. NOTE: the NYC Comptroller requires that owners and partners performing covered work on jobs requiring the payment of prevailing wages be paid the prevailing rate for any hours so worked. You are responsible for obtaining and checking Certified Payroll Forms from the contractor indicating the hours, wages, and benefits paid to the employees of the contractor who worked on the project. These forms need to be kept on file at the school after completion of the work.

Charter Schools are also subject to prevailing wage payment requirements for work in a City owned building or property. This is the position of Corporate Counsel based on the Appellate Court decision in the Pyramid Development case.

The process is outlined below:

  • The process begins when the school or organization initiates a third party request in the application. See link below to start a request.
  • You will be asked for information on your organization, what work you want to have done, the locations where work will be done, the contractor who will do the work, the cost of the work, whether the work will change the use of the space or the grade using the space, etc.
  • Your request will be routed for the required approvals to: The principal of the school in which the work will be done and after approval by the Principal to the Director of Facilities and (if change of use/grade is requested) to the Director of Space Planning.
  • Once approved, your request will be checked with regard to and approvals will be entered for items such as:
    • Contractor information including licenses, liens, previous issues with other City Agencies
    • Whether the contractor has appropriate and required insurance
    • To make sure your contractor is aware of the specific requirements of the Dust Control Protocol established for the safety of students and staff
    • Presence of ACM and/or LBP that will be disturbed by the work to be done
    • Materials being installed meet or exceed the Department’s minimum quality requirements for the items to be installed
  • You may be asked for additional information that we need to review your request. You will be notified and reminded if you have not gotten back to us with the information we need.
  • Once all the approvals are in place, you will be sent a copy of the final agreement which you will need to have signed and returned to DSF before work can start.

DOE and Charter Schools on the DOE Network click hereTo submit an Initial Request.
Charter Schools not on the DOE Network click here To submit an Initial Request

RESO A Capital Eligible Projects

Certain large projects may be eligible for capital funding. These projects include large auditorium renovations, library renovations, laboratory upgrades, and playground improvements among others. These projects are selected by your local City Council representative or your Borough President and funded through the capital program of the NYC School Construction Authority. Since the capital program for schools is a five year program, projects of this type, which enhance the learning experience, and improve the esthetics of your school are a good fit for RESO A projects as the capital program is driven by capacity needs, infrastructure needs, and specific programs. Below is a link to the NYC School Construction Authority’s very informative RESO A site. Once a RESO A project is awarded the funds flow to the SCA and depending on size and complexity of the project (generally less than $500,000 where formal plans are not required) the DSF may perform the work for the school and the SCA.

http://www.nycsca.org/Community/Programs/Pages/ResolutionA.aspx

Featured Improvement Projects

Below is a list of the most popular school improvement projects. The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).

Air-conditioning

Cool things off by adding window-unit air conditioners. Request a site visit so that a facilities expert can analyze the electrical and mounting requirements for your facility, provide a price estimate, and make arrangements for proper installation. Prices generally fall into two categories.

Prices:

Basic installation without additional electrical requirements. (Replacement of existing units) $900 TO $1400, per unit
Complex installation including new electrical wiring. $900 to $1400, per unit, plus cost of $2500 for installing dedicated electric circuit(s)
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).

In rare cases, some schools are located in electrical grids that can not support air conditioners.
Auditoriums

Before the curtain drops on next year’s student performances, give your school’s auditorium a face lift with new curtains and auditorium seats. The Facilities team will help purchase and install stage curtains and rigging that meets all safety regulations. Auditorium windows can also be fitted with curtains to block out distracting lights. If the auditorium chairs are beginning to show their age, then schools might consider replacing all seats or sections of seats as the school budget permits.

Prices:

Seats—All Schools $265 per seat
Curtains and Drapes—Elementary School $20,000 to $30,000
Curtains and Drapes—Elementary School with windows $30,000 to $45,000
Curtains and Drapes—Junior High School $40,000 to $60,000
Curtains and Drapes—Junior School with windows $50,000 to $75,000
Curtains and Drapes—High School $60,000 to $80,000
Curtains and Drapes—High School with windows $90,000 to $110,000
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).
Display Boards

Forget about dusty erasers and add new dry-erase or bulletin boards to classrooms, hallways, and other display areas.

Prices:

Dry-erase board 4'x 8' $750 each
Bulletin Boards 4'x 8' $650 each
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).
Floors

School facility teams will continue to provide general maintenance and repair of school floors. However, refinishing floors is a school improvement project that can substantially enhance the school environment. Give your facility new life by adding carpet, replacing vinyl tile, or refinishing hardwood floors.

Prices:

Classroom refinishing $2.50 per square foot
Gymnasium refinishing $2.50 to $3.00 per square foot
Auditorium Stage refinishing $2,000 to $8,000
Vinyl flooring with underlay $5 per square foot
Commercial grade carpet $40 per square yard
Allegro Dance Floor $22.50 per square foot
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).
Gymnasiums

Help students lock away textbooks, gym socks, and other personal property by installing new lockers. Don’t spruce up the locker room and forget about the fans. Also, consider installing comfortable new bleachers to keep the home crowd cheering.

Prices:

Interior lockers $280 each
Interior Bleachers $155 per seat
Wall Padding $8 per square foot
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).
Lighting and Electrical

Increase safety and energy efficiency with electrical improvement projects. Brighten up hallways and transform spaces in need of lights or replace old lighting systems with new more energy efficient models. Add roof and perimeter lighting to increase building security as well. Get the students to class on time with hard-wired clocks. Expand the school PA system to include modular systems in the cafeteria, gym, or other public spaces.

Prices:

Electrical Outlets (1-9) $2,000 each
Classroom Fixtures $300 each
Hallway/Stairway Fixtures $275 each
Security Lighting (Roof) $20,000 and up
Single Face Clocks $500 each
Double Face Clocks $800 each
PA System Survey needed to determine price.
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).
Painting

School wall paints are generally refreshed every five years, but maybe a school wants to show school spirit with a special new color or the new English teacher no longer likes the nature murals left on the classroom walls by the last science teacher. Schools can opt for special painting improvement projects.

Prices:

Classroom Ceiling $1,650
Classroom Complete $2,500
Corridors/Stairways $2.50 per square foot
Elementary School Gymnasium $15,000
Elementary School Cafeteria $10,000
Elementary School Auditorium $15,000
Junior High School Gymnasium $25,000
Junior High School Cafeteria $15,000
Junior High School Auditorium $25,000
High School Gymnasium $40,000
High School Cafeteria $25,000
High School Auditorium $50,000
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).
Playgrounds, Surfacing and Flagpoles

Fight childhood obesity and let students burn off some pent up energy on new and improved playground equipment. Schools that are not already slated for playgrounds as capital improvements through the School Construction Authority might consider sprucing up the school yard with some new additions and/or "poured" rubber playground surfacing.

Prices:

Poured in place rubber playground surfacing $18 per square foot
40' Fiberglass Flagpole $7,500
50' Fiberglass Flagpole $8,500
60' Fiberglass Flagpole $9,500
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).
Restrooms

Improve restroom facilities by replacing fixtures and tiles or execute a complete makeover.

Prices:

Elementary School conversion $20,000 to $30,000
Junior High School conversion $40,000 to $60,000
High School conversion $60,000 to $80,000
Toilet Partitions $1,900 each
Please note: The prices listed are only approximations to help determine if a particular project might be within range of the school’s budget. Actual prices will depend on the size of the school and project requirements. The contract manager will help the school determine the actual price during an initial school visit(s).

Contact DSF
  • For processing issues email Mark David, DSF’s Finance Director(MDavid@schools.nyc.gov 718-349-5794) or Mel Chaiken, DSF’s Controller(Mchaike@schools.nyc.gov 718-610-0257)
  • For operational questions go to your school's main contact person, the Deputy Director of Facilities (DDF). You can find out your DDF by entering your school's Building ID (not org ID) on DSF's web site.

Building Operator Certification Training Programing

Introduction
A Message from John Shea, DSF Chief Executive
The DOE is committed to reducing the energy consumption in our schools. Lowering our fossil fuel and electricity usage not only saves the City money, but even more importantly it creates a cleaner, healthier learning environment for our children. One of the most effective ways to reduce energy consumption in our school buildings is through the proper use and timely maintenance of the mechanical and electrical systems and equipment by the building operating staff.

This is why we are offering the Level I Building Operator Certification (BOC) Course. The BOC Course will cover HVAC systems, electrical systems, energy data and its use in operations, energy audits, integrated energy-related maintenance practice and indoor air-quality over a 30-week period. All training will be conducted at the DSF building at 44-36 Vernon Boulevard in Long Island City.

We have partnered with the IUOE, CUNY, and the Department of Citywide Administrative Services to develop a successful learning opportunity. We are very pleased to offer this certification program, and look forward to working with the building based staff in all the five boroughs to manage our school buildings in a more efficient and healthy manner.

A Message from Michael Bobker of the CUNY Building Performance Lab
The Building Operator Certification (BOC) is increasingly recognized as the leading credential in energy management and indoor environmental quality. As the New York City-authorized training provider for BOC, the CUNY Building Performance Lab has worked with the Division of School Facilities throughout the Summer of 2010 to customize a training program tailored to the needs of NYC DOE staff. While even this 90-hour program will not allow enough time to cover every topic in as much depth as we would like, I am confident that the participants will walk away from every session having learned one or two important new pieces of information and prepared to make change happen in their schools. Ultimately, the proof is in the pudding, and we hope to see the trainee's armed and motivated to make important operational changes that will enhance the school facilities’ performance. Along with CUNY’s School of Professional Studies, we look forward to providing this training over the coming two years.
Class Schedules
Please click here to view the Class Calendar

BOC Training for NYC public school custodial engineers two course sequence:
  • Building Systems: An Energy & Operations Perspective (Weeks 1-15)
  • Principles of Energy Management and Green Building Practices (Weeks 16-30)

Overview course description
Introduction to building systems, especially as related to energy use and the quality of the indoor environment. Focus on equipment and system functions, thermal comfort, lighting and air quality, understanding of building loads and their implications for optimized building control. Class and facility-based practical projects emphasize system observations, documentation, and testing for operational assessment and improvement. Use of EnergyStar Portfolio Manager and associated tools are emphasized for improved management of energy and water.
Instructional Team
  • Project Director: Patrick Dail, CUNY School of Professional Studies
  • Lead Instructor: Peter J. Weisner, CEM, LEED GA
  • Instructors: Peter M. Gorry, RPA / Asit Patel, CEM / Robert Bryce, RA
  • Instructional Supervisor: Michael Bobker, MS, CEM, Director CUNY Building Performance Lab
  • Office Hours: instructors will be available by appointment after classes (lunch and end of day)
Texts:
  • IUOE Indoor Air Quality Solutions for Stationary Engineers
  • Herzog, Peter Energy Efficient Operation of Commercial Buildings
  • BOC Handbooks - 105, 107
  • FEMP O&M Best Practices, release 3.0
Overall course desription:
The course’s learning objectives focus on the ability of building operators to pro-actively manage energy, water and indoor environmental quality within a planned maintenance framework.
  • Understand building mechanical and electrical systems, configurations and operating conditions and their implications for energy and indoor environmental quality (IEQ).
  • Identify, plan and implement improvements in operations and maintenance, especially as they relate to energy and the indoor environment.
  • Participate and communicate effectively in organizational processes for physical plant performance planning and improvements
  • Work quantitatively with energy and water data, system performance indicators and measures of IEQ.
  • Manage IAQ practices and conditions
  • Use on-line and web-based tools and resources

More specific Learning Objectives are associated with each section of the course and each class session.

CERTIFICATION: Building Operator Certification – Level 1
This 30 week, two-course sequence satisfies the training requirement of the nationally recognized BOC-Level 1.
  • Requirements and grading
    • Practical Projects (2) 40% (P = satisfactory work as evaluated by instructors)
    • Exams (6) 45% (P = 60%)
    • Attendance & Participation 15% (80% attendance is required minimum)
  • Assignments
    • Reading assignments should be completed for the class with which they are listed. The reading shown, for example, for week 2 should be completed before the week 2 class session. The instructor will be assuming that you have read the material.
    • Practicum Projects Two practical projects are required; one project for each 15-week course. Development of schematics and building data collection are emphasized; full detail of project requirements is provided separately. The projects should be based on the building with which the student is directly involved. A progress submission on the project is due at the end of every course module, ie – every 5th week.
    • Hand-held Instruments and Data-loggers will be demonstrated and used in class. They are available for loan for use in your facility in connection with your projects. Instruments must be signed out from the program office and must be returned and checked back in to the program office no more than two weeks from sign-out. DO NOT loan instruments to others; the person signing out an instrument will be held responsible for it.
    • Class Slides used in classes are to help you follow the lectures. They provide an outline and key points but do not contain everything that may be discussed in class. The slides will be available to you on the class website.

Weekly topics and reading assignments (30 weeks)
wkTopicIn-classReading
Building Systems: An energy and operations perspective
ASustainable High Performance Facilities: Maintaining The Learning Environment
1 Course Intro and Overview Dimensions of Building Performance & Why They Matter
2 Site Conditions and Mapping Identifying and documenting building and site conditions. Measurements with handheld instruments. Surveys

Exercise: site sketch with measurement and conditions notes
  • BOC 105 Handbook - pages 1 to 16
  • Herzog Chapter 1,2
  • US EPA IAQ Tools for Schools
  • See Additional Links for Further Learning below: Indoor Air Quality
3 Dimensions of Sustainability: Measuring Performance Working with rating systems, benchmarking and baselines of building performance

Exercise: Water Efficiency, calculating end-use and calibrating against meter readings
Demonstration: Data Loggers – video
4 Planned Maintenance Maintenance approaches & techniques —

Exercise/Discussion: Group review of Projects in context of annual planning – improvements in energy, heating, water, IE
  • IUOE text, Indoor Air Quality Solutions — Chapter 10
  • Recommended: FEMP Chapters 5 and Chapters 6
5 School Designs & New Technologies What to expect in HVAC, lighting, and renewable energy systems. How solar energy systems work.

Section Exam
Progress Project due
BLighting and Electric Power
6 Lighting Technology and Control Technology basics and energy

Exercise: Fixture wattage and spreadsheet lighting schedule
7 Lighting Quality and Maintenance Recognizing key elements for visual comfort, satisfaction and productivity

Exercise: Light level measurement
8 The Building Electrical System Basic electrical characteristics and typical system components, layouts and preventive maintenance.

Exercise: Electric System Schematic + PM
  • BOC 107 Handbook
9 Motors, On-site Generation and Demand Mgt Exercise: Group review of project work Motor construction and maintenance, on-site generation and managing peak demand.

Exercise: Considering what causes peaks and what can be controlled
10 Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Fundamental refrigeration principles and energy–related maintenance for common equipment

Section Exam
Progress Project due
CHeating & Ventilation
11 Loads and Building Dynamics How equipment is sized, how buildings respond and implications for operations

Exercise/Discussion: How do you determine your start-up and shut-down?
  • No reading assignment. Advise you get a jump on considering your project.
12 Boilers and Efficiency Key drivers of central plant efficiency

Exercise: Boiler room visit with survey form
13 Heating Distribution Managing distribution, even when not all the controls are working

Exercise: Steam distribution schematic (2nd boiler room visit)
14 Controls Control basics, terminology, principles. Sequences of Operation. Working with pneumatics and with DDC.

Exercise: Group review of projects.
  • IUOE chapter 12, 13

    Recommended: FEMP 9.11 (in the pdf, on the left column, click on "9.3 Steam Traps")
15 Ventilation and Air Distribution Systems How is ventilation air provided? What kinds of systems and quantities?

Exercise: Ventilation air quantity

Section Exam
Course project due
  • IUOE chapter 7 & 11
Principles Of Energy Management And Green Building Practices
AMaintenance For Indoor Air And Environmental Quality
16 Indoor Air Quality Sources and pathways. IAQ criteria, standards and regulations.

Exercise: Readings, project and survey
  • IUOE IAQ textbook Chapters 5, 7 & 11; IAQ Tools for Schools – Articles 1 to 5
17 IAQ Measurements What kinds of practices and measurements to maintain good IAQ and to troubleshoot?

Exercise: CO2 and other measurements
  • IUOE IAQ textbook Chapters 2, 3, 6 & 9;
    Recommended NECHPS O&M Guide pp 57-64 (see Schools Resources Bibliography for weblink)
18 IAQ / IEQ Protocols Documentation and communication

Exercise: IAQ Case Studies and Group review of projects
  • IUOE IAQ textbook Chapters 1, 4, 5 & 15
19 Maintenance Management Are we good maintenance managers?

Exercise:Planning preventive maintenance with lists and spreadsheets

Exercise:self-assessment using CIBSE tool
  • IUOE IAQ textbook Chapter 10; FEMP chapters 5 & 6
20 PM Targets for Improvement What might realistic PM improvement targets look like?

Exercise:integrating PM targets into the Annual Plan process

Section Exam
Progress Project due
  • Study for exam!
BEnergy Data, Benchmarking and Analytics
21 Energy sources & units Working with energy data

Exercise: Fuel-to-btu conversion and creating benchmarks
22 Performance Benchmarking How ESPM benchmarking works.

Exercise: Interpreting normalized data and ESPM computer lab
  • ESPM website: Overview, Benchmarking Starter, Source Energy, How the Rating System Works
23 Load Profiles & Trends What are load profiles and what can we tell from them over time?

Exercise: ESPM computer lab
  • Herzog chapters 4, 5
24 System Level Energy Usage Calculating consumption of systems and major equipment

Exercise: End-use allocation
  • Herzog chapters 4, 5 + Appendix B
25 Energy Improvement Targets What we can see about opportunities

Exercise: End-use allocation

Section Exam
Progress Project due
  • Herzog chapter 6
    Sample O&M Improvement Plan
CEnergy Improvement Processes
Energy Audits, Capital Projects & Retro-Commissioning
26 Energy Audits — Purpose, process, and calculations Purpose, process and calculation procedures of the energy audit

Demo: Audit calculations
27 Characterizing RCx and ECM projects Qualitative condition descriptions and basic quantification

Exercise: Boiler and heating improvement
28 Reading and using the energy audit report Steps and tips on using a full audit report.

Exercise: Goals from O&M and energy audit reports for goals into Annual Plan
29 Accepting Capital Projects Exercise: Group review of Projects Operating Manuals and energy specs.

Exercise: What you will look for in energy project hand-off
30 Closing Class Have we become better maintenance managers?

Section Exam
Course project due
Additional Links for Further Learning
Documents & Forms

Click the title to see the detail...

Request-for-work Forms
Approved Work Forms
Tax Exemption Information

The New York City Department of Education is exempt from fees for filing for work/construction and related permits with other City Agencies. Download this document and follow the directions step by step links to claim the exemption at the time of filing.

Frequently Asked Questions

Click the question to get the answer...

What Are We Responsible For?

There is often confusion regarding the role of the DSF and the School Construction Authority (SCA). The SCA builds new public schools and manages the repair and renovation of large capital construction projects. The DSF is primarily responsible for the maintenance, repair, and the safe, efficient operation of over 1,400 buildings that make up the Department of Education infrastructure. This would include cleaning, garbage disposal, heating, air conditioning, plumbing, carpentry, painting, minor repairs, environmental health and safety and all other aspects of building maintenance. In other words, the SCA builds it; we maintain and repair it. If, for example, a roof leaks, the DSF will fix the leak; if a roof needs to be replaced, that’s a job for SCA.

DSF manages its repairs and maintenance through a software application known as PassPort. This maintenance management system tracks all repair requests and monitors the progress of those jobs until their completion. To make repairs that fall outside the scope of work of our on site custodial staff, DSF relies on its own in-house workforce of some 700 skilled trades’ people as well as private contractors. All work is carefully monitored for quality and cost by DSF construction management professionals.

How do schools get repairs done?

The Division of School Facilities partners with schools to ensure all New York City public schools are safe and welcoming environments for student learning. This partnership involves two work streams: general maintenance and improvement projects.

General maintenance includes the day-to-day operations of the facility and repair or replacement of equipment due to normal wear and tear of the operating components of the building’s facility and grounds. This work stream is generally led by the school-based Custodian Engineer or Building Manager in consultation with the Principal and the school’s Deputy Director of Facilities. These functions are funded out of the Division of School Facilities' general operating budget; additional funding is not required from the school.

Improvement projects are initiatives not necessary for the general maintenance of the building but rather involve optional work which enhances or improves the facility. These projects are determined by the principal and funded solely from the school's discretionary budget. Given the challenging and time-consuming nature of managing a construction project which includes developing a scope of work and cost estimate as well as ensuring health, safety, labor law and building code regulations are being followed the Division of School Facilities is prepared to help schools initiate and manage school these projects for them. DSF calls this program the Market Maker program.

Management: Division of School Facilities Contract Managers are experienced professionals available to help schools initiate and manage school improvement projects. After an initial consultation, they will:

  • secure a contracted vendor
  • prepare a scope of work, including project cost
  • issue a proceed notice to the contractor, upon agreement of scope and price
  • inspect the work
  • ensure that the contractor conforms to standard maintenance and repair requirements (labor law, insurance, dust protocol, building code, etc.)
  • approve the contractor's application for payment

Cost: Most DSF Improvement Projects may range from $500 up to $100,000. If your project exceeds that amount, please feel free to contact Mark David (mdavid@schools.nyc.gov).

How can DOE School make Market Maker improvements?
  • Request a consultation
    Schools interested in exploring optional school improvement projects should contact their Custodian Engineer, Building Manager and/or school’s Deputy Director of Facilities (DDF).

    The Custodian Engineer, Building Manager, or DDF will enter the work request into the Division of School Facilities’ Maintenance Management System to initiate the request.
  • Work with a DSF Contract Manager
    A DSF Contract Manager will visit the school to develop, a scope of work, cost estimate and timeline for the project based on the school’s initial request and budget.
  • As many of these improvement projects include increasing the use of energy through the installation of air conditioning, smartboards or other technology it is important to remember that before any of these projects are performed DSF’s Office of Sustainability must first approve the project. The school’s DDF will assist in making this request to this Office.
  • Review and approve the project
    Once the DSF Contract Manager provides a scope of work and cost estimate, the principal reviews it for final approval.

    If the principal determines the school cannot afford to fund the project at the current time the quote will be honored by DSF through the end of the fiscal year.
  • Purchase Order Issued
    Once the project has been approved, the principal uses FAMIS to issue a purchase order to the Division of School Facilities (DSF) to pay for the project using the following process:

    • Schedule funds in Galaxy, almost always in object code 0676
    • Log into FAMIS
    • Go to Purchasing
    • Go to Contracted
    • Click on the NON-LIST-LINK and generate a PO to DSF using Vendor Code FAC000001 (Vendor Name: “Facilities Enhancements” ). Schools will go thru the same process to generate a PO to DSF as they would go through to generate a PO to any other contracted external professional services vendor except schools do not need to obtain competitive bids in order to generate a PO to DSF.
  • Schools cannot fund this project using grant money or funds emanating from the Department’s reimbursable codes (U /A 481/482) as DSF does not have the ability to access those accounts.
    • Once the PO is approved by the principal and/or its Network, DSF is electronically notified it has been given a PO and the Division’s Maintenance team can begin work.

      If assistance is required to generate the Purchase Order, schools should contact their Network leader for budget and accounting or DSF’s Finance office.
  • Work begins
    Once DSF receives the PO it authorizes DSF’s contractor to begin the project.
  • Approve the finished work
    After the work has been completed, the contract manager approves the vendor’s application for payment and pays the vendor using the funds provided to DSF by the school through its Purchase Order to DSF.
How can DOE School make Third Party improvements?

Third Party Agreements:

  • What is a Third Party Agreement?
    Third Party Agreements are for work which will be performed under the supervision of an individual selected by the responsible school or organization, and where the work will be done by a contractor selected by the school/organization and where the contractor does not have a direct contract for the work issued by the Department. The School or Organization (or others such as the school's Parents Association or a non-profit organization) will fund the project and is solely responsible for paying the contractor(s) for the work.
  • Why is a Third Party Agreement needed?
    Contractors working in our buildings need to be licensed (where required), have appropriate insurance for the protection of the Department, know our requirements for Dust Control and safety, use materials that are equal to or better than our standards, and follow all code requirements. The Third Party process and final agreement assures that these requirements are known and agreed to by your selected contractor.
  • Why is Funding Source information needed?
    If the work is funded by public (school or district) funds, then the work must be solicited in accordance with the Department's bidding procedures with appropriate documentation of your adherence to the procedures. Where the source of funds for the work to be performed comes from private sources, such as Alumni associations, Parents Associations, a Foundation, an individual, or a corporation, vendor selection is not subject to the SOPM requirements for solicitation of bids.
  • Why is the type of work required?
    Where required by code, the contractor performing the work must have a license for the work and be identified in the submittal. When the work requires filing with the Department of Buildings or other City agency, the school is responsible for engaging and paying for the services of the registered professional to design and file the work.
  • Why is the full scope and description of the work needed?
    You must have a full description of the work to be done. The scope of work submitted should reference the materials or equipment to be used (manufacturer's make and model for example). We strongly suggest that you and your contractors review the approved items for the type of work being done. These may be checked by going to the New York City School Construction Authority website In addition, The Chancellor has issued regulations regarding environmental sustainability in our schools. If electrical installations, upgrades or other projects are proposed that will increase the power consumption in the building, an energy plan will be required to show how the potential energy increase will be offset by school conservation measures to insure that there is no net increase of energy use in the building.
  • Why is it necessary to identify a Contract Manager?
    Your contractors must pay the prevailing rate for the trade doing the work. By law the party engaging a contractor on prevailing wage must designate someone to be responsible for obtaining and checking Certified Payroll Forms from the contractor indicating the hours, wages, and benefits paid to the employees of the contractor who worked on the project. These forms need to be kept on file at the school after completion of the work.
    NOTE: the NYC Comptroller requires that owners and partners performing covered work on jobs requiring the payment of prevailing wages be paid the prevailing rate for any hours so worked.
  • What is the Third Party Process?
    The process is outlined below:
    • The process begins when the school or organization initiates a third party request in the application. See link below to start a request.
    • You will be asked for information on your organization, what work you want to have done, the locations where work will be done, the contractor who will do the work, the cost of the work, whether the work will change the use of the space or the grade using the space, etc.
    • Your request will be routed for the required approvals to: The principal of the school in which the work will be done and after approval by the Principal to the Director of Facilities and (if change of use/grade is requested) to the Director of Space Planning. Once approved, your request will be checked with regard to and approvals will be entered for items such as:
      • Contractor information including licenses, liens, previous issues with other City Agencies
      • Whether the contractor has appropriate and required insurance
      • To make sure your contractor is aware of the specific requirements of the Dust Control Protocol established for the safety of students and staff
      • Presence of ACM and/or LBP that will be disturbed by the work to be done
      • Materials being installed meet or exceed the Department’s minimum quality requirements for the items to be installed
      • If the project will potentially increase the energy use in the building, the request will also be routed to the DSF Director of Sustainability.
    • You may be asked for additional information that we need to review your request. You will be notified and reminded if you have not gotten back to us with the information we need.
    • Once all the approvals are in place, you will be sent a copy of the final agreement which you will need to have signed and returned to DSF before work can start.
    • After work is completed, you will be required to forward us a signed “Certificate of Completion” which can be found on the last page of the Standard Agreement.
  • To submit an Initial Request click here
How can Charter Schools make Third Party improvements?

Charter Third Party Agreements:

  • What is a Third Party Agreement?
    Third Party Agreements are for work which will be performed under the supervision of an individual selected by you and your Charter Organization, and where the work will be done by a contractor selected by your Charter Organization and where the contractor does not have a direct contract for the work issued by the Department. The Charter will fund the project and is solely responsible for paying the contractor(s) for the work.
  • I already have to enter a request for approval of the work, why do I need a Third Party Agreement too?
    If you have submitted a request using the existing .pdf submittal process, and you want to select and manage the contractor performing the work for you, then DSF needs to be sure that Contractors working in our buildings are licensed (where required), have appropriate insurance for the protection of the Department, know our requirements for Dust Control and safety, use materials that are equal to or better than our standards, and follow all code requirements. The Third Party process and final agreement assures that these requirements are known and agreed to by your selected contractor. If you use the new on-line application, the request for work and the Third Party submittal share the same data entry screens and there is no need to enter a separate request.
  • Why is Funding Source information needed?
    If the work is funded by public (school or district) funds, then the work must be solicited in accordance with the Department's bidding procedures with appropriate documentation of your adherence to the procedures. Where the source of funds for the work to be performed comes from private sources, such as Alumni associations, Parents Associations, a Foundation, an individual, or a corporation, vendor selection is not subject to the SOPM requirements for solicitation of bids.
  • Why is Funding Source information needed?
    If the work is funded by public (school or district) funds, then the work must be solicited in accordance with public bidding procedures with appropriate documentation of your adherence to the procedures. Where the source of funds for the work to be performed comes from private sources, vendor selection is not subject to the SOPM requirements for solicitation of bids.
  • Why is the type of work required?
    Where required by code, the contractor performing the work must have a license for the work and be identified in the submittal. When the work requires filing with the Department of Buildings or other City agency, the Charter is responsible for engaging and paying for the services of the registered professional to design and file the work.
  • Why is it necessary to identify a Contract Manager?
    Your contractors must pay the prevailing rate for the trade doing the work. Corporate Counsel, based on the Appellate Court decision in the Pyramid Development case, has informed us that Charter Schools are subject to prevailing wage payment requirements for work in a City owned building or property.

    By law the party engaging a contractor on prevailing wage must designate someone to be responsible for obtaining and checking Certified Payroll Forms from the contractor indicating the hours, wages, and benefits paid to the employees of the contractor who worked on the project. These forms need to be kept on file at the school after completion of the work. NOTE: the NYC Comptroller requires that owners and partners performing covered work on jobs requiring the payment of prevailing wages be paid the prevailing rate for any hours so worked.
  • What is the Third Party Process?
    The process is outlined below:
    • The process begins when the school or organization initiates a third party request in the application. See link below to start a request.
    • You will be asked for information on your organization, what work you want to have done, the locations where work will be done, the contractor who will do the work, the cost of the work, whether the work will change the use of the space or the grade using the space, etc.
    • Your request will be routed for the required approvals to: The principal of the school in which the work will be done and after approval by the Principal to the Director of Facilities and (if change of use/grade is requested) to the Director of Space Planning. Once approved, your request will be checked with regard to and approvals will be entered for items such as:
      • Contractor information including licenses, liens, previous issues with other City Agencies
      • Whether the contractor has appropriate and required insurance
      • To make sure your contractor is aware of the specific requirements of the Dust Control Protocol established for the safety of students and staff
      • Presence of ACM and/or LBP that will be disturbed by the work to be done
      • Materials being installed meet or exceed the Department’s minimum quality requirements for the items to be installed
      • If the project will potentially increase the energy use in the building, the request will also be routed to the DSF Director of Sustainability.
    • You may be asked for additional information that we need to review your request. You will be notified and reminded if you have not gotten back to us with the information we need.
    • Once all the approvals are in place, you will be sent a copy of the final agreement which you will need to have signed and returned to DSF before work can start.
    • After work is completed, you will be required to forward us a signed “Certificate of Completion” which can be found on the last page of the Standard Agreement.
  • Charter Schools on the DOE Network click hereTo submit an Initial Request
    Charter Schools not on the DOE Network click hereTo submit an Initial Request
How do I report a problem?

Immediate emergencies, especially life threatening emergencies, or those involving urgent, time-critical issues of health and safety should always be reported to 911.

The public can report routine maintenance problems, or make other inquiries via 311, or contact the DSF directly. Click here to view the DSF Contact List.

A tree or its branches look like they may fall, what should I do?

The location of the tree is critical in determining what action should be taken. If the tree is located on the street, the Department of Parks has the responsibility for the tree. Click on the link to Report Tree Problem to Parks. If the problem is inside the fences of the school, please report the problem to the Custodian Engineer for appropriate action.

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